LDS Earth Stewardship - Search results trees are gold

"I hope we can learn to connect the dots and understand how we live and how we use resources and what resources we choose to use all affect the earth and the many communities of the poor across the world. We cannot pretend to live in isolation from these consequences. There is no scriptural foundation for believing that we live and act and consume in a vacuum."

Other Sources
George Handley
Other Writings of Mormons
"LDS environmental stewardship statement, recent talk share similarities with Pope Francis' encyclical," Deseret News, 19 June 2015.

"We know that the earth was prepared with all the resources we need and that it was given to us to choose how and what to use: 'For the earth is full, and there is enough and to spare; yea, I prepared all things, and have given unto the children of men to be agents unto themselves' (D&C 104:17). While it is clear the Lord has given us a full bank account, it might not be clear to all of us that He did not intend for us to waste or to allow us to be selfish in our use."

Other Sources
Reed E. Harris
Other Writings of Mormons
“'Oh Say, What Is Truth?',” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 73–9.

"Those of us who believe that the ecological problems caused by people are at least as much the result of what we are rather than how many of us there are, and Latter-day Saints are certainly among this number, have a tremendous responsibility. We have a solemn obligation to distance ourselves from those practices and trends that lead to the destruction of the Creation and to the related suffering of our fellow beings. We have an obligation to show the world that people can live peaceably with the Creation."

Other Sources
Aaron Kelson
Other Writings of Mormons
The Holy Place: Why Caring for the Earth and Being Kind to Animals Matters, p. 159-160.

“'Having food and raiment,”'says Paul, 'let us be therewith content' (1 Timothy 6:8). 'If we have our hundreds or thousands,' says Brother Brigham, 'we may foster the idea that we have nothing more than we need; but such a notion is entirely erroneous, for our real wants are very limited. What do we absolutely need? I possess everything on the face of the earth that I need, as I appear before you on this stand.' With our real wants thus modest, there is plenty on earth for everyone, 'for the earth is full and there is enough and to spare' (D&C 104:17), and no excuse whatever for competitive grabbing—'wherefore the world lieth in sin' (D&C 49:20). To take more than we need is to take what does not belong to us."

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"What is Zion? A Distant View," in Approaching Zion

"It behooves us as fortunate visitors in the King’s palace to behave circumspectly, to look and admire, damage nothing, take nothing with us, and leave everything as nearly as possible as we found it. Restraint is the watchword in dealing with God’s earth: The products of the earth are 'to please the eye [that always comes first!] and to gladden the heart; yea, for food and for raiment, for taste and for smell . . . to be used with judgment, not to excess, neither by extortion' (D&C 59:18—20). We may neither waste nor exploit what we find around us; Mirriam-Webster defines extortion as the obtaining 'from an unwilling or reluctant person by physical force, intimidation, or the abuse of legal or official authority.' We have a right to take what we need, but when we would extend that right to justify taking things we do not need, that is extortion, and is expressly forbidden."

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Brigham Young on the Environment," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; printed in Truman Madsen and Charles D. Tate, eds., To the Glory of God: Mormon Essays on Great Issues—Environment, Commitment, Love, Peace, Youth, Man (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1972), 3-29.

"The history of America during the first hundred years of Mormonism was largely the history of the frontier, and most Americans still like to imagine themselves living in a land of inexhaustible resources in which everything is 'up for grabs.' Brigham Young exposed and denounced that myth from the beginning, though he recognized its powerful appeal: 'We want to go where we can have plenty of range for our stock, . . . mount our horses, and ride over the prairies, and say, I am Lord of all I survey, . . . that we can get the whole world in a string after us, and have it all in our own possession, by and bye . . . This is the object many have . . . Elders of Israel are greedy after the things of this world.' 'Some want to be separated far from their neighbors, and own all the land around them, saying ‘all is right, all is peace.’' They simply are following the example of the adversary, who glories in his kingdom and his greatness where none dared molest or make afraid. But that illusion is not for the Saints."

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Brigham Young on the Environment," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; printed in Truman Madsen and Charles D. Tate, eds., To the Glory of God: Mormon Essays on Great Issues—Environment, Commitment, Love, Peace, Youth, Man (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1972), 3-29.

"Apparently wise and powerful people blame poverty and famine on there being too many people in some parts of the earth or in all the earth. With great passion they argue for limiting births, as if that would produce human happiness . . . Heavenly Father would not command men and women to marry and to multiply and replenish the earth if the children they invited into mortality would deplete the earth. Since there is enough and to spare, the enemy of human happiness as well as the cause of poverty and starvation is not the birth of children. It is the failure of people to do with the earth what God could teach them to do if only they would ask and then obey, for they are agents unto themselves."

Church Leaders
Henry B. Eyring
General Authorities
"The Family," Ensign, February 1998, 15.

"This concern with man's developing a more harmonious relationship with nature by abiding by its physical laws is timely and legitimate. When we interrupt or destroy the larger ecology of man's relationship to God and to his fellowmen, we are violating transcendental laws that are as immutable and as inevitable as those breached laws of nature for which we are now beginning to pay a terrible price. (Later installments will be even more severe.) That we do not fully understand these transcendental spiritual laws neither excuses us from learning of them, nor excuses us from their harsh consequences when we violate them."

Church Leaders
Neal A. Maxwell
General Authorities
For the Power Is in Them (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1970), 10.

"True disciples [of Christ] . . . would be consistent environmentalists—caring both about maintaining the spiritual health of a marriage and preserving a rain forest; caring about preserving the nutrient capacity of a family as well as providing a healthy supply of air and water . . . Adam and Eve were to 'dress the garden,' not exploit it. Like them, we are to keep the commandments, so that we can enjoy all the resources God has given us, resources described as 'enough and to spare' (D&C 104:17), if we use and husband them wisely."

Church Leaders
Neal A. Maxwell
General Authorities
A Wonderful Flood of Light (Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1990), 103.

“[O]ur current way of life is simply environmentally unsustainable. The immensely complex and still not fully understood systems that sustain life on earth are being destroyed by human activities.”

Church Leaders
Alexander B. Morrison
General Authorities
Visions of Zion (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1993), 77-78.

“Teach [children] the basic knowledge that the earth is the Lord’s. He has a marvelous system of replenishment and renewal so long as we care for, conserve, and waste not.”

Church Leaders
L. Tom Perry
General Authorities
"Train Up a Child," Ensign Oct. 1988

"The scriptures plainly teach that the spirits of mankind are known and numbered unto God before their earthly advent . . . The population of the earth is fixed according to the number of spirits appointed to take tabernacles of flesh upon this planet; when these have all come forth in the order and time appointed, then, and not till then, shall the end come."

Church Leaders
James E. Talmage
General Authorities
Articles of Faith (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1981), 193-94.

"[W]e owe something to future generations and those that declare 'plenty more where that came from' are recklessly indifferent to the gravest responsibilities . . . The Latter-day Saints ought not to be governed by purely selfish motives in the use of their landed inheritances. The number among us who have converted a single acre of our farms into forestry must be extremely small, and yet it is a duty which we owe to ourselves and to those who have the right to rely upon us to give this matter our earnest munerative; but we are so accustomed to look for immediate returns that we insist upon an early harvest for all that we do. The policy of living for today is not only destructive of our material interest, but it begets a selfishness harmful to religion and discreditable to patriotism."

Church Leaders
Joseph F. Smith
Presidents of the Church
Juvenile Instructor 38:466-467, Aug. 1, 1903

"All the creations are His work, and they are for His glory and for the benefit of the children of men; and all things are put into the possession of man for his comfort, improvement and consolation, and for his health, wealth, beauty and excellency."

Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 13:151

"The earth is here, and the fullness thereof . . . It was made for man; and one man was not made to trample his fellowman under his feet, and enjoy all his heart desires, while the thousands suffer. We will take a moral view, a political view, and we see the inequality that exists in the human family . . . The Latter-day Saints will never accomplish their mission until this inequality shall cease on the earth. If the people called the Latter-day Saints do not become one in temporal things as they are in spiritual things, they will not redeem and build up the Zion of God upon the earth."

Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 19:46

Charge them that are rich in this world, that they be not highminded, nor trust in uncertain riches, but in the living God, who giveth us richly all things to enjoy; That they do good, that they be rich in good works, ready to distribute, willing to communicate;

New Testament
1 Timothy
Scriptures
1 Timothy 6:17-18

"Our test on this earth is whether we will choose wisely and follow God, treat His creations with respect, and use them to bless our fellow man and woman. The better we care for this world and all in it, the better it will sustain, inspire, strengthen, enliven, and gladden our hearts and spirits—and prepare us to dwell with our Heavenly Father with our families in a Celestial sphere, which members of the LDS Church believe will be the very earth upon which we stand today, but in a glorified state."

Church Leaders
Marcus B. Nash
General Authorities
"Righteous Dominion and Compassion for the Earth." Speech at 18th Annual Stegner Center Symposium on 12 April, 2013.

"There is a spirit among the trees—are they not living souls? And, even more so for me above the timberline, amongst the mountain tops, where I feel a closeness to God. I love to sit or stand under the sky where heaven and earth meet, the high alpine peaks around me and to gaze at the stars at night, trying—always unsuccessfully—to wrap my mind around the eternity within my gaze, an eternity of both time and space (imagine, for example, the hundreds, or millions of light years it took for some of the light of the stars to reach this earth). Yet, I always marvel at the quiet knowledge that settles upon me in those solitary moments of tranquility that, despite the vastness of the cosmos, the Lord of the universe knows puny me."

Church Leaders
Marcus B. Nash
General Authorities
"Righteous Dominion and Compassion for the Earth." Speech at 18th Annual Stegner Center Symposium on 12 April, 2013.

"And then Zion, the wonderland of patriarchal temples and majestic peaks. I think perhaps she is claimed more by our friends from the southwest of the mountains, but we all claim her and someday the whole world will know her entrancing, inspiring beauty. When I can, I go to see her in the early Spring before the little freshets that gush from crevices in the lofty towers and walls of rock have drained the meager reservoirs of snow stored in the dizzy heights. I like to see the new green of the foliage against its background of brilliant hues. Her lacy waterfalls, her riot of color and the glory of her stupendous piles exalt the very soul of man. In their presence he cannot be small or mean. His vision is enlarged, his sympathies are broadened, his love of his fellow-men is deepened and his trust in God and the universe is supreme. He is made a better man. Are not all these, my friends, gifts to us? Are we not in very deed debtors for them?"

Church Leaders
Stephen L. Richards
General Authorities
“Avocation,” Improvement Era, June 1927, p. 686.

O how great is the nothingness of the children of men; yea, even they are less than the dust of the earth.

Book of Mormon
Helaman
Scriptures
Helaman 12:7

And now I ask, can ye say aught of yourselves? I answer you, Nay. Ye cannot say that ye are even as much as the dust of the earth; yet ye were created of the dust of the earth; but behold, it belongeth to him who created you.

Book of Mormon
Mosiah
Scriptures
Mosiah 2:25

For behold, are we not all beggars? Do we not all depend upon the same Being, even God, for all the substance which we have, for both food and raiment, and for gold, and for silver, and for all the riches which we have of every kind?

Book of Mormon
Mosiah
Scriptures
Mosiah 4:19

Where wast thou when I laid the foundations of the earth? declare, if thou hast understanding. Who hath laid the measures thereof, if thou knowest? or who hath stretched the line upon it? Whereupon are the foundations thereof fastened? or who laid the corner stone thereof; When the morning stars sang together, and all the sons of God shouted for joy?

Old Testament
Job
Scriptures
Job 38:4-6

The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament sheweth his handywork. Day unto day uttereth speech, and night unto night sheweth knowledge. There is no speech nor language, where their voice is not heard.

Old Testament
Psalms
Scriptures
Psalms 19:1-3

"Mountains seem to answer an increasing imaginative need in the West. More and more people are discovering a desire for them, and a powerful solace in them. At bottom, mountains, like all wildernesses, challenge our complacent conviction—so easy to lapse into—that the world has been made for humans by humans. Most of us exist for most of the time in worlds which are humanly arranged, themed and controlled. One forgets that there are environments which do not respond to the flick of a switch or the twist of a dial, and which have their own rhythms and orders of existence. Mountains correct this amnesia. By speaking of greater forces than we can possibly invoke, and by confronting us with greater spans of time than we can possibly envisage, mountains refute our excessive trust in the man-made. They pose profound questions about our durability and the importance of our schemes. They induce, I suppose, a modesty in us."

Other Sources
Robert Macfarlane
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Mountains of the Mind: Adventures in Reaching the Summit

"Just think of what science and astronomy tell us about the expanse of the solar system and the universe. Our solar system centers on the sun, one of a huge group of stars on the order of 100 billion stars swirling around a huge pinwheel-shaped mass called the Milky Way galaxy, which is about 100,000 light-years across. Astronomers cannot see to the end of the universe, but evidence suggests that the vastness of space contains billions of galaxies stretching for an expanse of 5 billion to 15 billion light-years away from the sun. Compared with such distances, our solar system occupies a very tiny amount of space. The universe is virtually incomprehensible to man."

Church Leaders
Robert D. Hales
General Authorities
"In Remembrance of Jesus," Oct. 1997

"That the infinite and eternal nature of creation and redemption are beyond mortal comprehension we are frank to admit. We are grateful that the Lord has given us this glimpse of everlasting truth relative to his unending labors; it is a brief view from his eternal perspective. But this earth and all that thereon is are our concern. It is the truths about 'our creation,' as it were, that will chart the course for us in our enduring efforts to gain eternal life."

Church Leaders
Bruce R. McConkie
General Authorities
"Christ and the Creation" - Ensign; June 1982

"The mighty gorge [Grand Canyon] is the demonstration of nature's power in changing the face of earth. How puny and insignificant it makes the strength of man appear! Humility and meekness are the burden of the message that rises from the silver ribbon of the river in its depths, up through the mists, to the reverent pilgrims who gather at this wonder of the world."

Church Leaders
Stephen L. Richards
General Authorities
April 1940 General Conference

"Think of the attitudes parents convey to children in such experiences, not necessarily attitudes about thunderstorms or snakes, but about life and the joy of living! Spiritual experiences can't be staged, but one fruitful avenue that involves our children and ourselves in inspiring experiences is to explore—fully and enthusiastically—God’s creations. In the course of growing up we tend to acquire a worldly sophistication that dampens this enthusiastic sense of wonder about nearly everything. Cultivating wonder about nature heightens our appreciation of all creation and begins to break down our artificial distinction between things temporal and spiritual (See D&C 29:34–35)."

Other Sources
Sharon Dequer
Church Magazines
"Discovering Nature" in June 1977 Ensign.

"[N]ature really can't be taught; it can only be discovered. And we adults cannot share in discovery until we reawaken our own ability to see the world through childlike eyes."

Other Sources
Sharon Dequer
Church Magazines
"Discovering Nature" in June 1977 Ensign.

"Gentleness they may have learned by example, but the rest is surely innate in the human child, curious to comprehend his world. Appreciation must surely begin with awareness; and awareness involves all one’s self."

Other Sources
Sharon Dequer
Church Magazines
"Discovering Nature" in June 1977 Ensign.

"A question as important as 'How does it work?' is 'How does it fit in?' Here’s where events and relationships, both large and small, enlarge your understanding as you look for similarity and variety, adaptation and development, interaction and interdependence, change and continuity. Each discovery is a fascinating glimpse into the intricate relationships of creation, which relationships are the true substance of ecology."

Other Sources
Sharon Dequer
Church Magazines
"Discovering Nature" in June 1977 Ensign.

"There’s a special dimension in discovering nature for Latter-day Saints. We know that 'all things' were 'created . . . spiritually, before they were naturally upon the face of the earth.' (Moses 3:5) That element of eternity means that we can never be calloused or careless about any element of our mortal experience. Our attitude toward nature, I'm convinced, is vitally connected with our attitudes toward ourselves."

Other Sources
Sharon Dequer
Church Magazines
"Discovering Nature" in June 1977 Ensign.

"For the past several hundreds of years, Western society has been dominated by a belief in scientific rationalism—a belief that science alone provides the key to man’s advancement, progression, and happiness. Older ideas about the need and place of beauty in life and the importance of the spiritual side of man’s nature have been superseded by an obsession with objective facts. Science is very much a creation of man’s intellect; it is amoral—neither good nor bad. Those who worship science, and there are many, worship the wrong god, for it alone will not bring happiness."

Other Sources
A.B. Morrison
Church Magazines
"Our Deteriorating Environment" in Aug 1971 Ensign.

"One way we can feel a surety of the Creator’s existence is to observe His handiwork. While it is the Holy Spirit that conveys such a testimony to our hearts, we may first prepare our hearts to receive it. A marvelous way to do this is to gaze into a star-filled sky on a moonless night or at the intricate patterns on the back of a single maple leaf."

Other Sources
Mark J. Nielsen
Church Magazines
"The Wonder of Creation" in March 2004 Ensign.

"[T]he human necessity is not just to know, but also to cherish and protect the things that are known, and to know the things that can only be known by cherishing. If we are to protect the world's multitude of places and creatures, then we must know them, not just conceptually but imaginatively as well. They must be pictured in the mind and in memory; they must be known with affection, 'by heart,' so that in seeing or remembering them the heart may be said to 'sing,' to make music peculiar to its recognition of each particular place or creature that it knows well . . . To know imaginatively is to know intimately, particularly, precisely, gratefully, reverently, and with affection."

Other Sources
Wendell Berry
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Life is a Miracle, 137-138

“The best remedy for those who are afraid, lonely or unhappy is to go outside, somewhere where they can be quite alone with the heavens, nature and God. Because only then does one feel that all is as it should be and that God wishes to see people happy, amidst the simple beauty of nature. As longs as this exists, and it certainly always will, I know that then there will always be comfort for every sorrow, whatever the circumstances may be. And I firmly believe that nature brings solace in all troubles."

Other Sources
Anne Frank
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
The Diary of a Young Girl

1. For the beauty of the earth, For the beauty of the skies, For the love which from our birth Over and around us lies, (Chorus) Lord of all, to thee we raise This our hymn of grateful praise.

2. For the beauty of each hour Of the day and of the night, Hill and vale, and tree and flow'r, Sun and moon, and stars of light,

3. For the joy of human love, Brother, sister, parent, child, Friends on earth, and friends above, For all gentle thoughts and mild,

Other Sources
Folliott S. Pierpoint
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
"For the Beauty of the Earth," LDS Hymn #92

"God declared the Creation to be 'very good'. When we care for and reverence His creations (including our fellow beings), we show love and respect for Him. Gratitude in turn brings additional blessings. The beauty of the earth goes beyond the surface to penetrate the careful observer's soul: 'That which is of God inviteth and enticeth to do good continually' (Moroni 7:13). Reverence and gratitude for the earth lead to increased faith in a Creator who provides a wonderfully beautiful and awesome place for His children to live."

Other Sources
Danielle Montague-Judd
Other Writings of Mormons
“How Can Church Members Increase Their Environmental Awareness? ,” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 141–53.

"There is something that inspires us when we view a great work of art. Fortunately this experience is available to even those who are distant from an art museum or treasured private collection—we need only look at a flower, a sunset, or the stars above our head to realize that we live within an artistic masterpiece."

Other Sources
Paul Cox
Other Writings of Mormons
“Paley's Stone, Creationism, and Conservation,” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 33–42.

"Brothers and sisters, if we truly love the Artist, let us not slash His painting. President David O. McKay taught that if we are to be great, we must reverence Deity and all things associated with Deity. To the degree that we believe the earth is associated with Deity, we must reverence the earth itself."

Other Sources
Paul Cox
Other Writings of Mormons
“Paley's Stone, Creationism, and Conservation,” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 33–42.

"[LDS members] are generally able to affirm and dismiss [the reverence-for-nature tradition] in one doublethink. There is a poetic truth about it, but most people today let scientific truth guide their thinking, and science teaches us to regard the earth as a lifeless object . . . This is not to say that Mormons are less environmentally responsible than other groups, only that their environmental consciousness no longer embraces some of the creative teachings of their early [church] leaders."

Other Sources
David Grandy
Other Writings of Mormons
"Heaven-Earth Wedges: The Mormon Experience," Proteus: A Journal of Ideas 15, no. 2 (1998): 59-60, 64.

"LDS scriptures clearly announce the centrality of human beings as God’s offspring and declare that all of creation was provided for human enjoyment and use. Significantly, however, this human-centered view does not justify abuse of nature; enjoyment and appreciation come before use."

Other Sources
George Handley
Other Writings of Mormons
"LDS Belief and the Environment" on Save Our Canyons website

"As we form a relationship with the natural world through study, faith, and action, we have the desire to care for it, which in turn increases our reverence for God."

Other Sources
Danielle Montague-Judd
Other Writings of Mormons
“How Can Church Members Increase Their Environmental Awareness? ,” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 141–53.

"It is through 'greater sensibility' that we both enjoy and endure, for the appreciation of beauty is nothing less than the key to survival. Nature has so provided that we actually enjoy most doing and sensing the very things most conducive to our survival; we delight in performing the most vital functions of life, and so simply by enjoying ourselves, we build up more formidable defenses against the powers of destruction than any accumulation of scientific data or learned admonition could provide. We eat long before we are in danger of dying of hunger and drink long before reaching a critical stage of dehydration, simply because we enjoy eating and drinking. If we ate, drank, breathed, and slept only when persuaded by irrefutable scientific demonstration that if we did not do those things we would die, we would not be long in this world. So it is in all things, and creatures as weak and vulnerable as man must cultivate a salutary sense of what is lovely and desirable and what is wrong and threatening, a feeling that hits them long before they can tell just why a thing is to be welcomed or dreaded."

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Brigham Young on the Environment," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; printed in Truman Madsen and Charles D. Tate, eds., To the Glory of God: Mormon Essays on Great Issues—Environment, Commitment, Love, Peace, Youth, Man (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1972), 3—29.

"Men and women in all parts of the world have a desperate need to take time to look carefully at the wonders of nature that surround us and devote ourselves to learning more about this world that God created for us!"

Church Leaders
M. Russell Ballard
General Authorities
"God's Love for His Children," 1988.

“Think of what would happen if all of us took time to look carefully at the wonders of nature that surround us and devoted ourselves to learning more about this world that God created for us!”

Church Leaders
M. Russell Ballard
General Authorities
"God's Love for His Children," 1988.

"We are rediscovering 'moderation' and seeing afresh the importance of 'quiet,' of 'smallness,' and of 'green.' Sound at shock levels, dazzling strobe lights which titillate the senses, if not overwhelm them, are a poor preparation for those who want to see a sunset or watch the grass grow. The cacophony that often attaches to the celebration of sensuous things may prevent us from hearing the little sounds of life so that, figuratively, we are diverted from noise only by a larger noise, such as the rumblings of an atomic bomb . . . Insensitivities come in clusters, but the result is the same: we shut out people, nature, and God."

Church Leaders
Neal A. Maxwell
General Authorities
A Time to Choose, pp. 70-71

"Year after year these wondrous works of nature delight me and encourage me. I always take my wife with me. I have long believed that no man can drink deep of the charms and love of nature without yearning for the companionship and sharing nearness of the partner of his life. We have sat, my wife and I, on the shores of Fish Lake, or moved a boat over its rippling, cool waters as the moon rose or the sun sank behind its wooded hills, and a peace and tranquility have enveloped us that passes understanding."

Church Leaders
Stephen L. Richards
General Authorities
“Avocation,” Improvement Era, June 1927, p. 685.

"Do you take time to discover each day how beautiful your life can be? How long has it been since you watched the sun set? The departing rays kissing the clouds, trees, hills, and lowlands good night, sometimes tranquilly, sometimes with exuberant bursts of color and form. What of the wonder of a cloudless night when the Lord unveils the marvels of His heavens—the twinkling stars, the moonlight rays—to ignite our imagination with His greatness and glory? How captivating to watch a seed planted in fertile soil germinate, gather strength, and send forth a tiny, seemingly insignificant sprout. Patiently it begins to grow and develop its own character led by the genetic code the Lord has provided to guide its development. With care it surely will become what it is destined to be: a lily, crowned with grace and beauty; a fragrant spearmint plant; a peach; an avocado; or a beautiful blossom with unique delicacy, hue, and fragrance. When last did you observe a tiny rosebud form? Each day it develops new and impressive character, more promise of beauty until it becomes a majestic rose. You are one of the noblest of God’s creations. His intent is that your life be gloriously beautiful regardless of your circumstances. As you are grateful and obedient, you can become all that God intends you to be."

Church Leaders
Richard G. Scott
General Authorities
"Finding Joy in Life," Ensign, May 1996, 24.

"As I watched this magnificent scene in reverence, a window formed in the clouds; the glistening rays of the rising sun broke through the overcast sky, transforming everything with its luminescence, its color, its life. It was as if the Lord wanted to share an additional blessing, a symbol of the light of His teachings that gives brilliance and hope to everyone it touches. Tears of gratitude formed for this wondrous world in which we live, for the extraordinary beauty our Heavenly Father so freely shares with all that are willing to see. Truly, life is beautiful."

Church Leaders
Richard G. Scott
General Authorities
"Finding Joy in Life," Ensign, May 1996, 24.

"Some of the happiest people I know have none of [the] things the world insists are necessary for satisfaction and joy. Why are they happy? . . . They glory in the beauty of the earth. They glory in the rivers and the canyons and the call of the meadowlark. They glory in the love of their families, the stumbling steps of a toddler, the wise and tender smile of the elderly."

Church Leaders
Joseph B. Wirthlin
General Authorities
"Lessons Learned in the Journey of Life," Ensign Dec. 2000

"When a man has found God and understands his ways, he learns that nothing in the universe came by chance, but all things resulted from a divinely prearranged plan. What a rich meaning comes into his life! Understanding which surpasses worldly learning is his. The beauties of the world become more beautiful, the order of the universe becomes more meaningful, and all of God’s creations are more understandable as he witnesses God’s days come and go and the seasons follow each in their order."

Church Leaders
Howard W. Hunter
Presidents of the Church
Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Howard W. Hunter

"We have eyes and see not, for that which we cannot appreciate or admire we are largely blind to, no matter how beautiful or inspiring it may be. As children of God, it is our duty to appreciate and worship Him in His creations. If we would associate all that is truly good and beautiful in life with thoughts of Him, we would be able to trace His handiwork throughout all nature."

Church Leaders
Joseph F. Smith
Presidents of the Church
Juvenile Instructor, 39:627-28, October 15, 1904.

"In the meadow there is art and there is beauty, as carefully crafted as the work of an artisan’s hands. The bright light of morning turns seed pods into brass sculptures. Dewdrops on a dragonfly’s wings become a cape of diamonds. Shadows on a leaf form bands of fluorescent green and black, abstract designs like those on a painter’s canvas. What from a distance had seemed a tapestry of interwoven colors, up close becomes a universe of individual realms. A plant becomes a city; a brook becomes a universe, each with its own structure, symmetry, visitors, and inhabitants. An ordinary spider’s web becomes an exhibit of form and function. Keep looking, closer and closer. Even in the smallest areas, design and order are evident. The Creator described himself as the light and life of the world. Everywhere I look in the meadow, I see his light and life."

Other Sources
Anselm Spring
Church Magazines
"The Meadow" in April 1985 New Era.

"The eye of the carnal man is limited. He wants to possess things in order to enjoy them. To profit from them, he thinks, they have to be his own. But there is a beauty in everyday life that outshines man-made beauty, a beauty that evaporates when someone tries to own it. If you want to possess it, it’s gone. You can't buy it for money. All things are the Lord’s, and we inherit them only by entering the celestial kingdom."

Other Sources
Anselm Spring
Church Magazines
"The Meadow" in April 1985 New Era.

"It is amazing to think that the influence of a single being can be present everywhere. Yet when we worship Christ, we recognize that in all of his creations he is present, that all forms of life are sacred and should be treated with great reverence. Is it strange to think that a meadow can bear testimony? This meadow bears a testimony to me. Through my simple walks here, I have learned to know the Master Creator and to rejoice in what he shares so freely with me."

Other Sources
Anselm Spring
Church Magazines
"The Meadow" in April 1985 New Era.

And now it came to pass that all this was done in Mormon, yea, by the waters of Mormon, in the forest that was near the waters of Mormon; yea, the place of Mormon, the waters of Mormon, the forest of Mormon, how beautiful are they to the eyes of them who there came to the knowledge of their Redeemer; yea, and how blessed are they, for they shall sing to his praise forever.

Book of Mormon
Mosiah
Scriptures
Mosiah 18:30

Behold, I say unto you, that you must rely upon my word, which if you do with full purpose of heart, you shall have a view of the plates, and also of the breastplate, the sword of Laban, the Urim and Thummim,which were given to the brother of Jared upon the mount, when he talked with the Lord face to face, and the miraculous directors which were given to Lehi while in the wilderness, on the borders of the Red Sea.

Doctrine and Covenants
Doctrine and Covenants
Scriptures
D&C 17:1

And when forty years were expired, there appeared to [Moses] in the wilderness of mount Sina an angel of the Lord in a flame of fire in a bush.

New Testament
Acts
Scriptures
Acts 7:30

"Think of the attitudes parents convey to children in such experiences, not necessarily attitudes about thunderstorms or snakes, but about life and the joy of living! Spiritual experiences can't be staged, but one fruitful avenue that involves our children and ourselves in inspiring experiences is to explore—fully and enthusiastically—God’s creations. In the course of growing up we tend to acquire a worldly sophistication that dampens this enthusiastic sense of wonder about nearly everything. Cultivating wonder about nature heightens our appreciation of all creation and begins to break down our artificial distinction between things temporal and spiritual. (See D&C 29:34–35.)"

Other Sources
Sharon Dequer
Church Magazines
"Discovering Nature" in June 1977 Ensign.

"One way we can feel a surety of the Creator’s existence is to observe His handiwork. While it is the Holy Spirit that conveys such a testimony to our hearts, we may first prepare our hearts to receive it. A marvelous way to do this is to gaze into a star-filled sky on a moonless night or at the intricate patterns on the back of a single maple leaf."

Other Sources
Mark J. Nielsen
Church Magazines
"The Wonder of Creation" in March 2004 Ensign.

"Mountains seem to answer an increasing imaginative need in the West. More and more people are discovering a desire for them, and a powerful solace in them. At bottom, mountains, like all wildernesses, challenge our complacent conviction—so easy to lapse into—that the world has been made for humans by humans. Most of us exist for most of the time in worlds which are humanly arranged, themed and controlled. One forgets that there are environments which do not respond to the flick of a switch or the twist of a dial, and which have their own rhythms and orders of existence. Mountains correct this amnesia. By speaking of greater forces than we can possibly invoke, and by confronting us with greater spans of time than we can possibly envisage, mountains refute our excessive trust in the man-made. They pose profound questions about our durability and the importance of our schemes. They induce, I suppose, a modesty in us."

Other Sources
Robert Macfarlane
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Mountains of the Mind: Adventures in Reaching the Summit

"Many Mormon readers, as well as readers who are not and never will be Mormon, expect—indeed, need—to find convincing spiritual matter present in nature writing. LDS writers are qualified to provide it."

Other Sources
Patricia Gunter Karamesines
Other Writings of Mormons
"Why Joseph Went to the Woods: Rootstock for LDS Literary Nature Writers" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, 44, no. 22 (Summer 2011)

"Study of the natural world leads to increased understanding of the principles upon which the earth operates as well as an understanding of our kinship with the earth through the recycling of matter. Additionally, study in the outdoors allows one to live, however briefly, away from the busyness of the everyday world and contemplate the human role in earthly existence."

Other Sources
Danielle Montague-Judd
Other Writings of Mormons
“How Can Church Members Increase Their Environmental Awareness? ,” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 141–53.

"Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, overcivilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity; and that mountain parks and reservations are useful not only as fountains of timber and irrigating rivers, but as fountains of life."

Other Sources
John Muir
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Our National Parks, (1901), chapter 1, page 1.

"We are the most dangerous species of life on the planet, and every other species, even the earth itself, has cause to fear our power to exterminate. But we are also the only species which, when it chooses to do so, will go to great effort to save what it might destroy."

Other Sources
Wallace Stegner
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
This is Dinosaur (1955)

"I suspect that the 'renewal' process will require as much careful, dedicated work as the original planting of the Garden of Eden."

Other Sources
Paul Cox
Other Writings of Mormons
“Paley's Stone, Creationism, and Conservation,” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 33–42.

"We know that the earth was prepared with all the resources we need and that it was given to us to choose how and what to use: 'For the earth is full, and there is enough and to spare; yea, I prepared all things, and have given unto the children of men to be agents unto themselves' (D&C 104:17). While it is clear the Lord has given us a full bank account, it might not be clear to all of us that He did not intend for us to waste or to allow us to be selfish in our use."

Other Sources
Reed E. Harris
Other Writings of Mormons
“'Oh Say, What Is Truth?',” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 73–9.

"The principle behind Young's zoophilic tendencies are found in his sermons as being related to man's responsibility for bringing about peace with animals and preparing for the millennial reign pictured by Isaiah. For example, Young held that the people should be holy . . . and then all animal life would also be filled with peace. He taught that 'the more kind we are to our animals, the more will peace increase and the savage nature of the brute creation will vanish away.' Young claimed it was man's fault strife existed on the earth and it was therefore up to man to 'remove the foul blot.' In order to 'restore all things to their primeval purity and innocence' man must have the help of God and live His laws. Bringing it to a personal level, Young argued that 'each people belonging to the human family' has a responsibility in 'removing the curse' from all creatures on earth. As for himself, Brigham Young stated if he saw an animal in the mud he made it his business to stop and help get it out. Even the lowly grasshopper was not driven from the garden of Brigham Young, but rather he would say they were welcome, 'these creatures of God.'"

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) pg 31-21

For behold, it is not meet that I should command in all things; for he that is compelled in all things, the same is a slothful and not a wise servant; wherefore he receiveth no reward. Verily I say, men should be anxiously engaged in a good cause, and do many things of their own free will, and bring to pass much righteousness; For the power is in them, wherein they are agents unto themselves. And inasmuch as men do good they shall in nowise lose their reward.

Doctrine and Covenants
Doctrine and Covenants
Scriptures
D&C 58:26-28

Have ye any that are sick among you? Bring them hither. Have ye any that are lame, or blind, or halt, or maimed, or leprous, or that are withered, or that are deaf, or that are afflicted in any manner? Bring them hither and I will heal them, for I have compassion upon you; my bowels are filled with mercy.

Book of Mormon
3 Nephi
Scriptures
3 Nephi 17:7

And they did impart of their substance, every man according to that which he had, to the poor, and the needy, and the sick, and the afflicted; and they did not wear costly apparel, yet they were neat and comely.

Book of Mormon
Alma
Scriptures
Alma 1:27

But behold, it is to get gain, to be praised of men, yea, and that ye might get gold and silver. And ye have set your hearts upon the riches and the vain things of this world, for the which ye do murder, and plunder, and steal, and bear false witness against your neighbor, and do all manner of iniquity.

Book of Mormon
Helaman
Scriptures
Helaman 7:21

Wherefore, verily I say unto you that all things unto me are spiritual, and not at any time have I given unto you a law which was temporal; neither any man, nor the children of men; neither Adam, your father, whom I created.

Doctrine and Covenants
Doctrine and Covenants
Scriptures
D&C 29:34

And he shall judge among the nations, and shall rebuke many people: and they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruninghooks: nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more.

Old Testament
Isaiah
Scriptures
Isaiah 2:4

Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.

New Testament
Philippians
Scriptures
Philippians 4:8

We then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves.

New Testament
Romans
Scriptures
Romans 15:1

"Though the prophets have spoken frequently about man’s responsibility to show proper treatment to animals in this world, very little detail is known about the states of animals in the eternities. Greater emphasis is rightly placed upon man’s need to live the gospel and be worthy to return to his Heavenly Father where he will then learn the answers to such questions. Quoting again from the editorial cited at the beginning of this article: 'Men cannot worship the Creator and look with careless indifference upon his creations. The love of all life helps man to the enjoyment of a better life. It exalts the spiritual nature of those in need of divine favor.'"

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Church Magazines
"I Have a Question - Where do animals fit in the eternal plan of things?" in March 1977 Ensign.

"There’s a special dimension in discovering nature for Latter-day Saints. We know that 'all things' were 'created . . . spiritually, before they were naturally upon the face of the earth.' (Moses 3:5.) That element of eternity means that we can never be calloused or careless about any element of our mortal experience. Our attitude toward nature, I'm convinced, is vitally connected with our attitudes toward ourselves."

Other Sources
Sharon Dequer
Church Magazines
"Discovering Nature" in June 1977 Ensign.

"When such questions trouble us as parents, the gospel gives us perspective. We know that committed Christians are neither cynical nor slothful; and as we, with our children, develop an appreciation for our Father’s creations, we also develop those other elements of faith—a sense of wonder and a sense of truth. Together we are discovering nature—including human nature and the divine nature as well."

Other Sources
Sharon Dequer
Church Magazines
"Discovering Nature" in June 1977 Ensign.

"An editorial published in the Juvenile Instructor in April 1918 was considered of such significance that it was repeated in April 1927. It stated: 'What is it to be humane to the beasts of the fields and birds of the air? It is more than to be considerate of the animal life entrusted to our care. It is a grateful appreciation of God’s creations. It is the lesson of divine love. To Him all life is a sacred creation for the use of His children. Do we stand beside Him in our tender regard for life? 'Our sense of appreciation should be quickened by a desire to understand divine purposes, and to keep the balance of animal life adjusted to the needs of creation. Man in his wanton disregard of a sacred duty has been reckless of life. He has destroyed it with an indifference to the evil results it would entail upon the earth. Birds have been uselessly slaughtered, and pests have sprung up as a consequence to plague the people of the world. Animals in the providence of the creation have been intended as a prey upon one another. They preserve a safe balance for the benefit of man. '... The unnecessary destruction of life is a distinct spiritual loss to the human family. Men cannot worship the Creator and look with careless indifference upon his creations. The love of all life helps man to the enjoyment of a better life. It exalts the spiritual nature of those in need of divine favor. 'The wanton destruction of life reacts upon the human family. There is something in the law of compensation which makes criminals injure and destroy life. Men who are unsympathetic toward the life of domestic animals entrusted to them usually receive the reward of their cruelty by the dumb animals which they maltreat. Love begets love in all creation, and nature responds bounteously to the tender treatment of man. '... Nature helps us to see and understand God. To all His creations we owe an allegiance of service and a profound admiration. Man should be kind to the animals which serve him both directly and indirectly. An angry word or a brutal blow wounds the heart from which it comes. Love of nature is akin to the love of God; the two are inseparable.'”

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Church Magazines
"The Gospel and Animals" in Aug 1972 Ensign.

"Our common home is like a sister with whom we share our life and a beautiful mother who opens her arms to embrace us . . . This sister now cries out to us because of the harm we have inflicted on her by our irresponsible use and abuse of the goods with which God has endowed her. We have come to see ourselves as her lords and masters, entitled to plunder her at will. The violence present in our hearts, wounded by sin, is also reflected in the symptoms of sickness evident in the soil, in the water, in the air and in all forms of life. This is why the earth herself, burdened and laid waste, is among the most abandoned and maltreated of our poor."

Other Sources
Pope Francis
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Encyclical Letter Laudato Si': On Care for Our Common Home (24 May 2015)

"The violence present in our hearts, wounded by sin, is also refected in the symptoms of sickness evident in the soil, in the water, in the air and in all forms of life."

Other Sources
Pope Francis
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Encyclical Letter Laudato Si': On Care for Our Common Home (24 May 2015)

"A sense of deep communion with the rest of nature cannot be real if our hearts lack tenderness, compassion and concern for our fellow human beings. It is clearly inconsistent to combat trafficking in endangered species while remaining completely indifferent to human trafficking, unconcerned about the poor, or undertaking to destroy another human being deemed unwanted. This compromises the very meaning of our struggle for the sake of the environment."

Other Sources
Pope Francis
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Encyclical Letter Laudato Si': On Care for Our Common Home (24 May 2015)

"Moreover, when our hearts are authentically open to universal communion, this sense of fraternity excludes nothing and no one. It follows that our indifference or cruelty towards fellow creatures of this world sooner or later affects the treatment we mete out to other human beings. We have only one heart, and the same wretchedness which leads us to mistreat an animal will not be long in showing itself in our relationships with other people. Every act of cruelty towards any creature is 'contrary to human dignity.'"

Other Sources
Pope Francis
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Encyclical Letter Laudato Si': On Care for Our Common Home (24 May 2015)

"He that plants trees loves others beside himself."

Other Sources
Thomas Fuller
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Gnomologia (1732) no. 2247

"Men will turn again with renewed interest to the animal world. In these disordered days a stupid, uncontrollable massacre of animal species goes on—from certain angles of vision it is a thing almost more tragic than human miseries; in the nineteenth century dozens of animal species, and some of them very interesting species, were exterminated; but one of the first fruits of an effective world state would be the better protection of what are now wild beasts. It is a strange thing in human history to note how little has been done since the Bronze Age in taming, using, befriending, and appreciating the animal life about us. But that mere witless killing which is called sport today, would inevitably give place in a better educated world community to a modification of the primitive instincts that find expression in this way, changing them into an interest not in the deaths, but in the lives of beasts, and leading to fresh and perhaps very strange and beautiful attempts to befriend these pathetic, kindred lower creatures we no longer fear as enemies, hate as rivals, or need as slaves. And a world state and universal justice does not mean the imprisonment of our race in any bleak institutional orderliness. There will still be mountains and the sea, there will be jungles and great forests, cared for indeed and treasured and protected; the great plains will still spread before us and the wild winds blow. But men will not hate so much, fear so much, nor cheat so desperately—and they will keep their minds and bodies cleaner."

Other Sources
H.G. Wells
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
The Outline of History: Being a Plain History of Life and Mankind, pg. 1098

"What we do about ecology depends on our ideas of the man-nature relationship. More science and more technology are not going to get us out of the present ecologic crisis until we find a new religion, or rethink our old one."

Other Sources
Lynn White
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
"The Historical Roots of Our Ecological Crisis" in The Ecocriticism Reader: Landmarks in Literary Ecology. Ed. C. Glotfelty and H. Fromm. Athens, Georgia: U of Georgia Press, 1996.

"I believe that ceasing enmity toward animals will lead to a greater depth of spirituality, sensitivity, and charity in the hearts of the Latter-day Saints and help prepare the earth for the Millennium. We must change for harmony to exist in the world of nature and things. Only then can we be fully at peace with each other and with all of God’s creatures."

Other Sources
Jane Birch
Other Writings of Mormons
Discovering the Word of Wisdom, pg 86

"As Berry and many others suggest, the problems associated with the environmental crisis—pollution, species extinction, climate change—are but symptoms of a much deeper failure on the part of our civilization to relate to the earth and its creatures in moral terms."

Other Sources
Jason M. Brown
Other Writings of Mormons
"Whither Mormon Environmental Theology?" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011)

"I have often thought that in our day and age—and I believe that there is some precedence in the scriptures for this, such as references to pollution in the last days and so on—one of the areas at which we could look seriously and about which we could feel good is this area of cleaning up our environment. I have a feeling that pollution is going to get worse and that there are going to be a lot of jobs in this area. I am convinced that the Lord is against pollution. He is against perversion. He is against prostitution—and prostitution has a much broader meaning than just its limited sexual sense; it really means perverting something from its correct use to an incorrect use. I would think that prostitution and pollution and perversion are all about the same, and God is against such things. How we treat him is reflected in how we treat others who are his children, and how we treat the elements and other forms of life on this earth, which are his. He created them. If there were one safe area in which to look for a livelihood, I think it would be in this area. I do not know whether this would be your avocation or not, but you might think about it. I am convinced in my own mind that we have not really fulfilled our mission in life as individuals or as a Church until we have demonstrated and shown as much advancement in other areas as we have in theology. We know how government ought to be, we know how society ought to be, we know what cleanliness ought to be, we know what the environment really should be; we should lead out in these areas. For instance, we recognize that we have environmental problems. I am not sure what the answer is, but I do not think the answer is what some “environmentalists” think it is—that is, to stop whatever we are doing—because we as a race must produce. I am not sure how to do it, but I am sure that there is a right way; we just need to discover it. I do not believe that the Lord is pleased with the constant corruption and pollution we so willingly endure—not just spiritually, but physically—to achieve some of our goals. I personally cannot help but believe that there is a better way. I cannot help but feel that God knows how to transform all of these base materials into useful tools without all the choking clouds of dust and the stench of pollution in our rivers and streams. He put our resources here, he put us here, and he knows what we need. He knows what is here and how to get things done. I do not think that he is against energy. I think that he is for all of these things, and wants us to use them in the proper way to get around, do his work, and build up his kingdom. But my faith is that there is a better way than we now know. He wants us to use the elements—to mold them for our use—but in a different way. Now should that not be something that you students here at BYU could figure out—with the Lord’s help? (And who should be closer to him than you?) We have talked about missions for individuals, and we are all aware of the Church mission. In my mind, BYU, as part of the Church, should become the pollution control center of the world—not only spiritually, but physically. I feel that this is important. We take the gospel to all the world in a spiritual way; we ought to do it in other ways, also . . . I guess we could say that, as far as our life’s mission is concerned, both spiritually and physically, we could feel good about doing away with pollution and putting purity in its place. That is a real challenge and is something that we should do. You at this University should be the leaders in doing it."

Church Leaders
John H. Groberg
General Authorities
"What is Your Mission?" Brigham Young University 1979 Speech

"It is unrighteousness in general that is bringing the earth down, not just environmental abuse; indeed, one gets the impression from all that Enoch sees and hears in this vision that a little smog is the least of the earth's worries. But that in itself is an important point and teaches a lesson that is often overlooked in discussions about the environment: nature suffers when man is unrighteous. Enoch is telling us [in Moses 7:48] that the earth, like God, has a low tolerance for sin of any sort, and that the strip mining, overgrazing, air pollution, and animal abuse that constitute the meat and drink of mainstream environmentalism today are actually only part, and probably a small part, of the problem. Just as devastating to the planet, perhaps in ways not as immediately apparent but every bit as real, is the 'great chain' Satan holds in his hand, with which he veils 'the whole face of the earth with darkness' (Moses 7:26). One shows 'compassion upon the earth,' to use the prophet's phrase, by keeping all God's commandments, not just those that speak directly to the subject" (Moses 7:49).

Other Sources
Andrew Hedges
Other Writings of Mormons
“'Compassion upon the Earth': Man, Prophets, and Nature,” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 81–8.

"While marching, as the story went, a dog had growled menacingly at Sylvester [Smith]. Reportedly he had threatened, 'If that dog bites me, I'll kill him.' Heber C. Kimball recorded that Joseph Smith turned to the angry Sylvester and said, 'If you kill that dog, I'll whip you.' The Prophet, according to Kimball, showed 'the brethren how wicked and unchristian like such conduct appeared before the eyes of truth and justice.' Commenting further upon the incident, Joseph Smith said that men should be ashamed of such a spirit of contention and 'ought never to place themselves on a level with the beasts; but be possessed of a more noble disposition.'"

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) Page 23, footnote: Joseph Smith, History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, ed. B.H. Roberts (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 1959), II, 83, 156.

"Next to the scriptures, the most important pronouncements from prophets to the Latter-day Saints are statements signed by the First Presidency of the Church. During Brigham Young's term as President two such statements contained references to animals. The first was written "To the Saints in Utah" by Brigham Young and his two counselors, Heber C. Kimball and Jedediah M. Grant. It was dated September 14, 1854, and referred to people with a cantankerous attitude. They claimed that such 'a person becomes disagreeable to himself, to his family . . . to his animals for they have reason, and in short to all the true intelligences around him.' The second statement was signed by Brigham Young and a new pair of counselors, George A. Smith and Daniel H. Wells. Concerning those living a new type of economic order, the official statement gave advice to provide adequate food and shelter for 'humanely caring for stock during winter.'"

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) Page 35, footnote: James R. Clark, ed., Messages of the First Presidency (Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1965), II, 150, 262-63.

"No man or woman, no boy or girl, who has any kind feelings will inflict unnecessary pain upon any creature. Such persons will not hurt a worm. Animals feel pain very acutely. They know when they are treated kindly and when they are abused. God has given them this feeling, and if men or boys abuse them, He will condemn and punish them for so doing. They prove themselves unworthy of the power they have, and, by their cruelty, they sink beneath the brute."

Church Leaders
George Q. Cannon
General Authorities
"Editorial Thoughts," The Juvenile Instructor, III (September 1, 1868), 132.

"[George Q.] Cannon explained that the only successful technique to catch the wild horses was by the lasso rope. But, he said, 'this is a very cruel way of catching horses, and ought never to be practiced by people like us.' President Cannon contended that lassoing horses was 'fit only for savages' and a 'rude, barbarous people, like the Californians were when we settled this valley.' The practice was further criticized in the editorial because the horses were 'ruined' by the operation. The use of spurs on the horses was also condemned because it was 'very cruel'. Expressing disgust with the use of spurs, George Q. Cannon stated, 'They treated the poor dumb creatures, which God had given them as though they had no feeling.' 'Such conduct is brutal and sinful,' the editorial continued, 'and punishment in some form will fall upon those who indulge in it.' Further developing the concept that man would be held accountable by God for his treatment of animals, Cannon said cruelty to animals was 'very sinful.' He asked the question, 'Will a man who has the Spirit of God be cruel or unkind to dumb creatures because they are in his power?' He answered with an emphatic 'No.' Indeed, he wrote, 'the spirit of God fills men and boys with love and compassion' and thus they would no sooner hurt an animal than they would a human companion."

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) Page 45, footnote: Juvenile Instructor, VI (May 13, 1871), 76.

"Editorially, President Cannon continued to write on zoophilic topics. One editorial decried the 'far too general' disposition of Latter-day Saints to 'kill wild animals and birds, and every insect which crosses their path.' He asked, 'Why there should be such eagerness to kill these creatures.' If men hunted game 'because they have pleasure in taking their lives,' President Cannon suggested the hunter imagine himself in the position of the hunted. The editor admitted a 'great difference between animals and human beings,' but declared all were given life by God and so should be respected and treated with kindness. Animals were meant to be used by man for food, according to Cannon, but only with 'prudence and thanksgiving and not wastefully.' He contended that too often animals' lives were 'very much wasted to gratify the hunting propensity of some men.' He explained that if humans needed animals for food the 'Lord is not displeased if they kill it.' On the other hand, Cannon emphasized, if people hunted for the 'mere pleasure of killing' then sin was committed. Cannon then referred to prophecies concerning the time when 'wild and ferocious' animals would dwell together in kindness. But, Cannon warned, before that day would come, men must 'cease their war upon the animals, the reptiles and the insects.' In the peaceful state looked for in the future, Cannon promised that animals would be harmless and 'universal peace will prevail.'"

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) Page 50, footnote: Juvenile Instructor, XXIV (December 1, 1889), 548-9

"A short announcement of Humane Day in 1911 commented favorably on recent legislation to protect animals in the United States. However, the 'editorial thought' was that while the passage of laws was helpful, education was the more effective approach to avoid cruelty to animals. It was stated that kindness to animals should be 'a matter of principle, not law.' The editor suggested that children 'be taught from infancy to be kind and tender' to the animals under human care. Further, he stated: 'When every soul gets into the condition of mind that he will go out of his way to ease the suffering of a dumb animal, then many of the cruelties now complained of will disappear from the earth forever.'"

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) Page 60, footnote: Juvenile Instructor, XLVI (February, 1911), 83.

"Also during Joseph F. Smith's time as Church President, superintendent of the Sunday Schools, and editor of the Juvenile Instructor, a special editorial on 'Humane Day' was published. Signatures accompanying the editorial were of the Sunday School superintendency, which included the future President of the Church, David O. McKay, and Stephen L. Richards, later counselor in the First Presidency to David O. McKay. This same editorial was repeated by Heber J. Grant, successor to Joseph F. Smith as President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and editor of the Juvenile Instructor. Thus three Presidents of the Church gave their endorsement and published this important statement on zoophily in the Church. Because of its unique status this document is also reproduced in full. "'What is it to be humane to the beasts of the fields and the birds of the air? It is more than to be considerate of the animal life entrusted to our care. It is a grateful appreciation of God's creations. It is the lesson of divine law. To Him all life is a sacred creation for the use of His children. Do we stand beside Him in our tender regard for life? "Our sense of appreciation should be quickened by a desire to understand divine purposes, and to keep the balance of animal life adjusted to the needs of creation. Man in his wanton disregard of a sacred duty has been reckless of life. He has destroyed it with an indifference to the evil results it would entail upon the earth. Birds have been uselessly slaughtered, and pests have sprung up as a consequence to plague the people of the world. We are a part of all life and should study carefully our relationship to it. We should be in sympathy with it, and not allow our prejudices to create a desire for its destruction. The unnecessary destruction of life begets a spirit of destruction which grows within the soul. It lives by what it feeds upon and robs man of the love that he should have for the works of God. It hardens the heart of man and makes him prey upon the social welfare which he should feel for the happiness and advancement of his fellow man. "The unnecessary destruction of life is a distinct spiritual loss to the human family. Men cannot worship the Creator and look with careless indifference upon his creation. The love of all life helps man to the enjoyment of a better life. It exalts the spiritual nature of those in need of divine favor. The wanton destruction of life reacts upon the human family. There is something of the law of compensation which makes criminals injure and destroy life. Men who are unsympathetic toward the life of domestic animals entrusted to them usually receive the reward of the cruelty by the dumb animals which they maltreat. Love begets love in all creation, and nature responds bounteously to the tender treatment of man. "Men learn more easily in sympathetic relationships of all life than they do in the seclusion of human interest. Their minds are more open to the manifestations of that inspiration which all nature gives to those who lovingly enjoy her. Wisdom and virtue come from the animal and vegetable world which carries with it a spiritual as well as a material blessing. Nature helps us to see and understand God. To all His creations we owe an allegiance of service and a profound admiration. Man should be kind to the animals which serve him both directly and indirectly. An angry word or a brutal blow wounds the heart from which it comes. Love of nature is akin to the love of God; the two are inseparable.'"

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) Page 64-5, footnote: Juvenile Instructor, LIII (April, 1918), 182-3; Juvenile Instructor, LXII (April, 1927), 190-1.