LDS Earth Stewardship - Search results trees are gold

"Institutions must have their art forms, their symbolic representations, and if the Heavenward aspirations of medieval Christianity found their expression in cathedrals and spires, the more mundane aspirations of the Latter-day Saints may just as readily be discovered in the widespread plantings of Mormon trees. They look Heavenward, but their roots are in the earth. The Mormon looked toward Heaven, but his Heaven was a Heaven on earth and he would inherit bliss in the flesh."

Other Sources
Wallace Stegner
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Mormon Country, 24.

"In the New Testament God's commitment to be 'with us' and to fully share in the life of this world becomes most intimate in the flesh of Jesus of Nazareth. Jesus does not ever dismiss or disparage bodies . . . instead he heals and feeds and exorcises and touches the bodies of others so that they can each live into the fullness of their potential."

Other Sources
Norman Wirzba
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
From Nature to Creation: A Christian Vision for Understanding and Loving Our World, 2

"The order of Zion is such as will leave the earth as near its primordial, paradisiacal condition as possible. The paradise of Eden is called in the scriptures 'the garden of the Lord' (Genesis 13:10), and we are told that God and his holy angels delighted to come to it and commune with Adam in its delightful surroundings."

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Our Glory or Our Condemnation," in Approaching Zion.

O Saints of Zion, hear the voice Of Him from courts on high. Prepare the pathway of the Lord; His reign on earth is nigh. Prepare the supper of the Lamb; Invite the world to dine. Behold, the mighty Bridegroom comes In majesty divine.

Other Sources
Ed M. Rowe
Other Writings of Mormons
"O Saints of Zion," LDS Hymnal, #39

And righteousness will I send down out of heaven; and truth will I send forth out of the earth, to bear testimony of mine Only Begotten; his resurrection from the dead; yea, and also the resurrection of all men; and righteousness and truth will I cause to sweep the earth as with a flood, to gather out mine elect from the four quarters of the earth, unto a place which I shall prepare, an Holy City, that my people may gird up their loins, and be looking forth for the time of my coming; for there shall be my tabernacle, and it shall be called Zion, a New Jerusalem.

Pearl of Great Price
Moses
Scriptures
Moses 7:62

"Our test on this earth is whether we will choose wisely and follow God, treat His creations with respect, and use them to bless our fellow man and woman. The better we care for this world and all in it, the better it will sustain, inspire, strengthen, enliven, and gladden our hearts and spirits—and prepare us to dwell with our Heavenly Father with our families in a Celestial sphere, which members of the LDS Church believe will be the very earth upon which we stand today, but in a glorified state."

Church Leaders
Marcus B. Nash
General Authorities
"Righteous Dominion and Compassion for the Earth." Speech at 18th Annual Stegner Center Symposium on 12 April, 2013.

"A saint, who is one in deed and in truth, does not look for an immaterial heaven but he expects a heaven with lands, houses, cities, vegetation, rivers, and animals; with thrones, temples, palaces, kings, princes, priests, and angels; with food, raiment, musical instruments, etc.; all of which are material."

Church Leaders
Orson Pratt
General Authorities
The Latter-day Saints' Millennial Star 28:722, Nov. 1866

"The greatest acts of the mighty men [have been disastrous]. Before them the earth was a paradise, and behind them a desolate wilderness. . . . The designs of God, on the other hand, have been to promote the universal good of the universal world; to establish peace and good will among men; to promote the principles of eternal truth; to bring about a state of things that shall unite man to his fellow man; cause the world to 'beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks,' make the nations of the earth dwell in peace, and to bring about the millennial glory, when 'the earth shall yield its increase, resume its paradisean glory, and become as the garden of the Lord.'"

Church Leaders
Joseph Smith, Jr.
Presidents of the Church
"Editorial, 15 July 1842–A," p. 855, The Joseph Smith Papers.

“Our business is not . . . to prepare to go to another planet. This is our home.”

Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 8:297

“We are for the kingdom of God, and are not going to the moon, nor to any other planet pertaining to this solar system. . . . This earth is the home he has prepared for us, and we are to prepare ourselves and our habitations for the celestial glory in store for the faithful."

Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 8:294

O Lord, how manifold are thy works! in wisdom hast thou made them all: the earth is full of thy riches. So is this great and wide sea, wherein are things creeping innumerable, both small and great beasts.

Old Testament
Psalms
Scriptures
Psalms 104:24-25

"Can Heavenly Father be any less pleased with this willful destruction of nature than when we break the Word of Wisdom? Certainly, if we are to become like him, we must begin to master the skills necessary to preserve and encourage the processes of life. It seems to me that part of our responsibility as caretakers for the earth is to learn about those processes and take advantage of opportunities to protect our world’s resources."

Other Sources
G. Michael Alder
Church Magazines
"Earth—A Gift of Gladness" in July 1991 Ensign.

"The ecological teaching of the Bible is simply inescapable: God made the world because He wanted it made. He thinks the world is good, and He loves it. It is His world; He has never relinquished title to it. And He has never revoked the conditions, bearing on His gift to us of the use of it, that oblige us to take excellent care of it."

Other Sources
Wendell Berry
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
What Are People For? (1990), pg. 98.

"Every creature is better alive than dead, men and moose and pine trees, and he who understands it aright will rather preserve its life than destroy it."

Other Sources
Henry David Thoreau
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
The Maine Woods, pg 62.

"We are likewise stewards over this beautiful earth, to keep and protect it as a sacred and precious gift. After creating this earth and all the creatures thereon, God proclaimed them to be good. God loves not just us, but the whole earth, and all the creatures on it. In fact, God gave commandments not just to us, but also to all His creatures. And He covenanted not just with us, but also with every living creature (Genesis 9:8-15)."

Other Sources
Jane Birch
Other Writings of Mormons
Discovering the Word of Wisdom, pg 81

"These principles have been well developed in the literature and are only summarized briefly here. First, the earth and all creation belong to God; they witness, bear record of, and reflect his power and love for humankind. The earth’s resources are to be used not just to meet human needs but also to elevate the human spirit. All forms of life have intrinsic value. All are creations of God. All living things have a spiritual as well as an earthly dimension, and all were created spiritually before being placed on the earth physically (see Moses 3:5; D&C 59:18). Second, our use of resources should be guided by principles of equity, conservation, and minimal waste; consumption that meets our needs; and restraint that encourages spiritual values (D&C 49:19–20; 70:14; 104:14–17). Third, materialism and overconsumption are threats to environmental and spiritual well-being. The biblical injunction of Luke 12:15, 'Take heed, and beware of covetousness: for a man’s life consisteth not in the abundance of the things which he possesseth,' is repeated in Mormon scriptures where members are urged to seek first the kingdom of God and to trust not in the things of the world (see Jacob 2:18–19; D&C 121:35). Fourth, humans have a sacred stewardship to protect and preserve creation for themselves and for succeeding generations (D&C 104:11–17)."

Other Sources
Gary C. Bryner
Other Writings of Mormons
"Theology and Ecology: Religious Belief and Environmental Stewardship," in BYU Studies 49, no. 3 (2010)

"If the sources of human life are sacred and to be protected, so too then is the earth's capacity to nurture us and to bring forth all of life abundantly."

Other Sources
George Handley
Other Writings of Mormons
“Mormon Views of Environmental Stewardship” in Routledge Handbook on Religion and Ecology, edited by Mary Evelyn Tucker, John Grim, and Willis Jenkins. 97-106.

"If Mormons are serious about ending inequality and they are serious about restoring dignity to the lives of the most poor and the most vulnerable in society, as the law of consecration demands, then they should be equally serious about respecting the creation as God's, understanding property as contingent, avoiding overconsumption in all of its forms, and honoring and protecting the sacred sources of physical life."

Other Sources
George Handley
Other Writings of Mormons
“Mormon Views of Environmental Stewardship” in Routledge Handbook on Religion and Ecology, edited by Mary Evelyn Tucker, John Grim, and Willis Jenkins. 97-106.

"Also during Joseph F. Smith's time as Church President, superintendent of the Sunday Schools, and editor of the Juvenile Instructor, a special editorial on 'Humane Day' was published. Signatures accompanying the editorial were of the Sunday School superintendency, which included the future President of the Church, David O. McKay, and Stephen L. Richards, later counselor in the First Presidency to David O. McKay. This same editorial was repeated by Heber J. Grant, successor to Joseph F. Smith as President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and editor of the Juvenile Instructor. Thus three Presidents of the Church gave their endorsement and published this important statement on zoophily in the Church. Because of its unique status this document is also reproduced in full. "'What is it to be humane to the beasts of the fields and the birds of the air? It is more than to be considerate of the animal life entrusted to our care. It is a grateful appreciation of God's creations. It is the lesson of divine law. To Him all life is a sacred creation for the use of His children. Do we stand beside Him in our tender regard for life? "Our sense of appreciation should be quickened by a desire to understand divine purposes, and to keep the balance of animal life adjusted to the needs of creation. Man in his wanton disregard of a sacred duty has been reckless of life. He has destroyed it with an indifference to the evil results it would entail upon the earth. Birds have been uselessly slaughtered, and pests have sprung up as a consequence to plague the people of the world. We are a part of all life and should study carefully our relationship to it. We should be in sympathy with it, and not allow our prejudices to create a desire for its destruction. The unnecessary destruction of life begets a spirit of destruction which grows within the soul. It lives by what it feeds upon and robs man of the love that he should have for the works of God. It hardens the heart of man and makes him prey upon the social welfare which he should feel for the happiness and advancement of his fellow man. "The unnecessary destruction of life is a distinct spiritual loss to the human family. Men cannot worship the Creator and look with careless indifference upon his creation. The love of all life helps man to the enjoyment of a better life. It exalts the spiritual nature of those in need of divine favor. The wanton destruction of life reacts upon the human family. There is something of the law of compensation which makes criminals injure and destroy life. Men who are unsympathetic toward the life of domestic animals entrusted to them usually receive the reward of the cruelty by the dumb animals which they maltreat. Love begets love in all creation, and nature responds bounteously to the tender treatment of man. "Men learn more easily in sympathetic relationships of all life than they do in the seclusion of human interest. Their minds are more open to the manifestations of that inspiration which all nature gives to those who lovingly enjoy her. Wisdom and virtue come from the animal and vegetable world which carries with it a spiritual as well as a material blessing. Nature helps us to see and understand God. To all His creations we owe an allegiance of service and a profound admiration. Man should be kind to the animals which serve him both directly and indirectly. An angry word or a brutal blow wounds the heart from which it comes. Love of nature is akin to the love of God; the two are inseparable.'"

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) [Pages 64-5, footnote: Juvenile Instructor, LIII (April, 1918), 182-3; Juvenile Instructor, LXII (April, 1927), 190-1.]

"As we progress in incorporating gospel culture more fully in our lives, a deep sense of incongruence with physical surroundings that are ugly, polluted, and deprived of life grows within us. We are familiar with the many ecological promises God has made, such as the declaration in our tenth article of faith that the 'earth will be renewed and receive its paradisiacal glory.' We wonder how we can participate with other like-minded people, including those not of our faith, in helping such promises be fulfilled, for we find them to be motivating, ennobling, and harmonious with what we know about the eternal nature of all mankind. We do not want to repeat past mistakes in our actions toward the Creation. Rather, it is our hope that the ebb and flow of intelligent, faith-directed action toward the Creation will give way to sustained improvement in attitudes and behaviors that are consistent with the eternal value of the Creation and its integral role in our own development."

Other Sources
Aaron Kelson
Other Writings of Mormons
“The Hope for Extraordinary Ecological Improvement,” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 89–95.

"God declared the Creation to be 'very good.' When we care for and reverence His creations (including our fellow beings), we show love and respect for Him. Gratitude in turn brings additional blessings. The beauty of the earth goes beyond the surface to penetrate the careful observer's soul: 'That which is of God inviteth and enticeth to do good continually' (Moroni 7:13). Reverence and gratitude for the earth lead to increased faith in a Creator who provides a wonderfully beautiful and awesome place for His children to live."

Other Sources
Danielle Montague-Judd
Other Writings of Mormons
“How Can Church Members Increase Their Environmental Awareness?” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 141–53.

And the Gods prepared the waters that they might bring forth great whales, and every living creature that moveth, which the waters were to bring forth abundantly after their kind; and every winged fowl after their kind. And the Gods saw that they would be obeyed, and that their plan was good.

Pearl of Great Price
Abraham
Scriptures
Abraham 4:21

"Our religion teaches us that human life is most sacred and should not be wantonly taken. The Lord also has spoken with great plainness concerning the animal creation. The beasts, fowls, and fishes are all the creation of His power and their lives are precious in His sight. No properly constituted person will lightly take the life of any creature; and every girl should be taught that it is wrong to adorn herself with feathers obtained from the slaughter of birds. Animals, fowls and fish are created for the use of man; but their lives should not be wasted. They are to supply the wants of man, not to be slaughtered for mere amusement or for the gratification of vanity."

Church Leaders
George Q. Cannon
General Authorities
Juvenile Instructor 28:712-713, Nov. 15, 1893

"We should by every means in our power impress upon the rising generation the value of life, and how dreadful a sin it is to take life. The lives of animals even should be held far more sacred than they are. Young people should be taught to be very merciful to the brute creation and not to take life wantonly or for sport. The practice of hunting and killing game merely for sport should be frowned upon and not encouraged among us. God has created the fowls and the beasts for man's convenience and comfort, and for his consumption at proper times and under proper circumstances; but he does not justify men in wantonly killing those creatures which He has made and with which He has supplied the earth."

Church Leaders
George Q. Cannon
General Authorities
Juvenile Instructor 31:218-219, April 1, 1896

"Not only is animal life capable of happiness, but it is also included within the scope of His redeeming power, as taught in this uniquely LDS scripture: [D&C 29:23-25] . . . Plainly, all forms of life identified in this verse have great value in the eyes of God, for they are the workmanship of His hand, and will be blessed by His redeeming power. This doctrine leads one to view plant and animal life differently, as living souls created by God."

Church Leaders
Marcus B. Nash
General Authorities
"Righteous Dominion and Compassion for the Earth." Speech at 18th Annual Stegner Center Symposium on 12 April, 2013.

"As I watched this magnificent scene in reverence, a window formed in the clouds; the glistening rays of the rising sun broke through the overcast sky, transforming everything with its luminescence, its color, its life. It was as if the Lord wanted to share an additional blessing, a symbol of the light of His teachings that gives brilliance and hope to everyone it touches. Tears of gratitude formed for this wondrous world in which we live, for the extraordinary beauty our Heavenly Father so freely shares with all that are willing to see. Truly, life is beautiful."

Church Leaders
Richard G. Scott
General Authorities
"Finding Joy in Life," Ensign, May 1996, 24.

"It is not likely that someone who does not love his neighbor will be concerned with his adverse impact on the environment. . . . If there is disregard for oneself, there will be disregard for one's neighbor. If there is no reverence for life itself, there is apt to be little reverence for the resources God has given man. The outward expressions of irreverence for life and for fellowmen often take the form of heedless pollution of both air and water. But are these not expressions of the inner man? You are among those who must undertake the task of alerting mankind to problems with regard to his physical environment, but do you not see that if you attempt to do this without giving heed to the spiritual law involved, you undertake an impossible task."

Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
The Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson (Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1988), 643

“Further, the mission of Jesus will be unfinished until He redeems the whole human family, except the sons of perdition, and also this earth from the curse that is upon it, and both the earth and its inhabitants can be presented to the Father redeemed, sanctified and glorious. Things upon the earth, so far as they have not been perverted by wickedness, are typical of things in heaven. Heaven was the prototype of this beautiful creation when it came from the hand of the Creator, and was pronounced ‘good.’”

Church Leaders
Joseph F. Smith
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 23:175.

"The earth and its heaven shall, after passing away through death, be renewed again in immortality. This earth is living and must die, but since it keeps the law it shall be restored through the resurrection by which it shall become celestialized and the abode of celestial beings. The Lord intends to save, not only the earth and the heavens, not only man who dwells upon the earth, but all things which he has created. The animals, the fishes of the sea, the fowls of the air, as well as man, are to be recreated, or renewed, through the resurrection, for they too are living souls. The earth, as a living body, will have to die and be resurrected, for it, too, has been redeemed by the blood of Jesus Christ."

Church Leaders
Joseph Fielding Smith
Presidents of the Church
Doctrines of Salvation (compiled by Bruce R. McConkie) 1:46

"Here are the elements; they are not made in vain, but are made for the benefit, comfort convenience and happiness of God’s children."

Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses, 8:340, January 20, 1861.

“'Mormons, of all people, should be nonmaterialistic,' Dr. Murphy suggested. 'But concern about ecology in the Church is not new. All of our theology indicates that the earth is a very important place, spiritually and temporally.' To the Prophet Joseph Smith, the Lord revealed: 'Yea, all things which come of the earth . . . are made for the benefit and the use of man, both to please the eye and to gladden the heart . . . for taste and for smell, to strengthen the body and to enliven the soul (D&C 59:18–19)."

Other Sources
Richard Olsen
Church Magazines
"Ecology, Pollution, and Consumerism," in Sept 1971 New Era.

"It is amazing to think that the influence of a single being can be present everywhere. Yet when we worship Christ, we recognize that in all of his creations he is present, that all forms of life are sacred and should be treated with great reverence. Is it strange to think that a meadow can bear testimony? This meadow bears a testimony to me. Through my simple walks here, I have learned to know the Master Creator and to rejoice in what he shares so freely with me."

Other Sources
Anselm Spring
Church Magazines
"The Meadow" in April 1985 New Era.

"The reason we are in trouble ecologically is because of our inability to see ourselves as a part of nature. We have not seen ourselves for what we are: part of the web of life and part of the biological community; a portion of an incredibly complex ecological system; and intimately a part of the total environment. Our ability to acquire and apply technical information has far outstripped our biological ability to adapt to the changes technology has brought."

Other Sources
A.B. Morrison
Church Magazines
"Our Deteriorating Environment," Aug 1971 Ensign.

"Nature is a part of our humanity, and without some awareness and experience of that divine mystery man ceases to be man. When the Pleiades and the wind in the grass are no longer a part of the human spirit, a part of very flesh and bone, man becomes, as it were, a kind of cosmic outlaw, having neither the completeness and integrity of the animal nor the birthright of a true humanity."

Other Sources
Henry Beston
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
The Outermost House: A Year of Life on the Great Beach of Cape Cod, x.

"A sense of deep communion with the rest of nature cannot be real if our hearts lack tenderness, compassion and concern for our fellow human beings. It is clearly inconsistent to combat trafficking in endangered species while remaining completely indifferent to human trafficking, unconcerned about the poor, or undertaking to destroy another human being deemed unwanted. This compromises the very meaning of our struggle for the sake of the environment."

Other Sources
Pope Francis
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Encyclical Letter Laudato Si': On Care for Our Common Home (24 May 2015)

"Moreover, when our hearts are authentically open to universal communion, this sense of fraternity excludes nothing and no one. It follows that our indifference or cruelty towards fellow creatures of this world sooner or later affects the treatment we mete out to other human beings. We have only one heart, and the same wretchedness which leads us to mistreat an animal will not be long in showing itself in our relationships with other people. Every act of cruelty towards any creature is 'contrary to human dignity.'"

Other Sources
Pope Francis
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Encyclical Letter Laudato Si': On Care for Our Common Home (24 May 2015)

"Everything is related, and we human beings are united as brothers and sisters on a wonderful pilgrimage, woven together by the love God has for each of his creatures and which also unites us in fond affection with brother sun, sister moon, brother river and mother earth."

Other Sources
Pope Francis
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Encyclical Letter Laudato Si': On Care for Our Common Home (24 May 2015)

"We are as much alive as we keep the earth alive."

Other Sources
Chief Dan George
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Quoted in Roy C. Dudgeon's Common Ground: Eco-Holism and Native American Philosophy, pg. 319.

"One touch of nature makes the whole world kin."

Other Sources
William Shakespeare
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Troilus and Cressida. Act III. Sc. 3. L. 175.

"Just as we depend on this earth, the earth depends on us. We are intimately interrelated, and I'm concerned that she groans under our sins. The biological and physical worlds are pure. They fully obey the will of the Lord and are redeemed through their service to us, but they also suffer due to our disobedience. I believe we humans are the cause of much of the 'natural' chaos in the world. It is a reflection of who we are and of the choices we have made."

Other Sources
Jane Birch
Other Writings of Mormons
Discovering the Word of Wisdom, pg 86

"One reason Church leaders may have felt so strongly about this issue is that the Latter-day Saint view on animals is fairly unique among Christians. We believe animals, like humans, are eternal beings (see D&C 77:2–3); that they are 'living souls' (Moses 3:19) who will be 'resurrected and glorified' in God’s presence; and that we are accountable to God for our stewardship over them (see JST Genesis 9:5 and D&C 104:11–14)."

Other Sources
Jane Birch
Other Writings of Mormons
Discovering the Word of Wisdom, pg 87-8

"As Berry and many others suggest, the problems associated with the environmental crisis-pollution, species extinction, climate change—are but symptoms of a much deeper failure on the part of our civilization to relate to the earth and its creatures in moral terms."

Other Sources
Jason M. Brown
Other Writings of Mormons
"Whither Mormon Environmental Theology?" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011)

"All creatures exist in their own particular spheres. . . . We feel a kinship with the animals—and we should. We are going to live with them in the eternities. We should love the critters, and they will learn to love us."

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
Of All Things! Classic Quotations from Hugh Nibley, compiled by Gary P. Gillum

When we move beyond the Sunday School answers and consider these episodes from an animal studies perspective, however, the stories begin to yield important insights into the development of a viable Mormon ethic of interspecies and intercultural care that, according to Mormon thought, has (or should be perceived as having) implications of eternal significance. Lehi’s family’s experience in the desert illustrates the doctrine that would shortly be articulated more directly in the Book of Moses (1830) and Joseph Smith’s translation of Genesis 9:11, in revelations that would be canonized as sections 49, 59, and 77 of the Doctrine and Covenants (1831–32) and, most explicitly, in the 1833 Word of Wisdom: the idea that animals are eternal beings possessing spirits, are subject to Christ’s atonement, are more than Cartesian automata or symbolic screens for human spiritual needs and truths, and that their lives—like human lives—are to be taken only under strictly defined conditions.

Other Sources
Bart H. Welling
Other Writings of Mormons
“'The Blood of Every Beast': Mormonism and the Question of the Animal" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011).

"A sustainable relationship with the Earth nurtures a sustainable relationship with God, because we acknowledge and honor the power of reciprocity, that there are in fact limits and consequences of what we desire. If we act on the premise that we are not alone, that other individuals and creatures have wants and needs, that our definition of community is not just human-centered but Creation-centered, then we begin to engage in a spiritual economics that promises to be more unselfish than our present relationship to other. We cannot continue to simply take from the Earth without giving back something in return, even if that means drawing on principles of restraint, generosity, gratitude, and compassion."

Other Sources
Terry Tempest Williams
Other Writings of Mormons
"West of Eden," in New Genesis: A Mormon Reader on Land and Community

"To be whole. To be complete. Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to rather than what we are separate from."

Other Sources
Terry Tempest Williams
Other Writings of Mormons
“Statement of Terry Tempest Williams, Naturalist-in-Residence Utah Museum of Natural history, Salt Lake City, Utah, before the Senate Subcommittee on Forest & Public Lands Management regarding theUtah Public Lands Management Act of 1995. Washington, D.C. July 13, 1995”

"We can never afford to be cruel or indifferent or ungenerous, because we are all connected, even if it is in a pattern that only God sees."

Church Leaders
Chieko Okazaki
General Authorities
"Cat's Cradle of Kindness," April 1993 General Conference.

"The idea prevails in general, I believe, in the religious world where the Gospel truth is misunderstood, that man is the only being on the earth that has what is called a 'soul' or a spirit. We know this is not the case, for the Lord has said that not only has man a spirit, and is thereby a living soul, but likewise the beasts of the field, the fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, have spirits, and hence are living souls. But this does not make them kinsmen to the sons and daughters of God. They are our Father's creations, not his offspring, and that is the great difference between man and beast. It would be a very strange world where animals were not found. If, after the resurrection of the dead, we discovered that man was the only living creature with immortality, we would certainly consider it a very strange world. Yet the idea does prevail that man has a spirit and the animals have not, and this is the great thing that distinguished man from all other beings. The fish, the fowl, the beasts of the field, lived before they were placed naturally in this earth, and so did the plants that are upon the face of the earth. No doubt the spirits that possess the bodies of the animals are in the similitude of their bodies. In other words the bodies of animals conform to the spirits which possess them, and which existed before they were placed on the earth. The Lord has made nothing to be destroyed. He has not [built] to tear down, but what is done is done with the idea of permanency."

Church Leaders
Joseph F. Smith
Presidents of the Church
Doctrines of Salvation 1:40

"We are a part of all life and should study carefully our relationship to it. We should be in sympathy with it, and not allow our prejudices to create a desire for its destruction. The unnecessary destruction of life begets a spirit of destruction which grows within the soul. It lives by what it feeds upon and robs man of the love that he should have for the works of God. It hardens the heart of man and makes him prey upon the social welfare which he should feel for the happiness and advancement of his fellow-man. The unnecessary destruction of life is a distinct spiritual loss to the human family. Men cannot worship the Creator and look with careless indifference upon his creations. The love of all life helps man to the enjoyment of a better life. It exalts the spiritual nature of those in need of divine favor."

Church Leaders
Joseph F. Smith
Presidents of the Church
Juvenile Instructor 53;182-183, April 1918

For man is spirit. The elements are eternal, and spirit and elements inseparably connected, receive a fullness of joy; And when separated, man cannot receive a fulness of joy.

Doctrine and Covenants
Doctrine and Covenants
Scriptures
D&C 93:33-34

Of every clean beast thou shalt take to thee by sevens, the male and his female: and of beasts that are not clean by two, the male and his female. Of fowls also of the air by sevens, the male and the female; to keep seed alive upon the face of all the earth.

Old Testament
Genesis
Scriptures
Genesis 7:2-3

“Many good people believe that alligators were created by the Devil, thus accounting for their all-consuming appetite and ugliness. But doubtless these creatures are happy and fill the place assigned them by the great Creator of us all. Fierce and cruel they appear to us, but beautiful in the eyes of God. . . . The universe would be incomplete without man; but it would also be incomplete without the smallest transmicroscopic creature that dwells beyond our conceitful eyes and knowledge.”

Other Sources
John Muir
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
"A Thousand Mile Walk to the Gulf" (1867), in American Earth, 86, 88.

"We are not told in detail all the covenants the creatures of this earth made. We know that they, like us, were commanded to multiply and replenish the earth (Genesis 1:22). But we also know animals have a role to play in the preservation of human life: 'And whoso forbiddeth to abstain from meats, that man should not eat the same, is not ordained of God; For, behold, the beasts of the field and the fowls of the air and that which cometh of the earth, is ordained for the use of man and for raiment, and that he might have in abundance' (D&C 49:18-19)."

Other Sources
Jane Birch
Other Writings of Mormons
Discovering the Word of Wisdom, pg 81-2

"In commanding Adam to 'be fruitful, and multiply,' God also informed him that he had given the identical command to all his other creatures, and furthermore, that he was putting Adam in charge of things to see to it that his purposes were fulfilled. Specifically, he was to 'replenish the earth, and subdue it, and to have dominion over' every living thing in the biosphere (Abraham 4:28). There are two clearly marked departments—the earth itself as a storehouse and source of life, which Adam is to keep replenished (filled is the word), and the creatures that move about on and over the earth, over which he is to have dominion. As Brigham Young explains it, while 'subduing the earth' we must be about 'multiplying those organisms of plants and animals God has designed shall dwell upon it,' namely, 'all forms of life,' each to multiply in its sphere and element and have joy therein."

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
“Man’s Dominion, or Subduing the Earth,” in Brigham Young Challenges the Saints (Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book, 1994), 6.

"Granted there are different levels and degrees that exist within as well as between species, still it is the privilege of every form of life to multiply in its sphere and element and have joy therein."

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Brigham Young on the Environment," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; printed in Truman Madsen and Charles D. Tate, eds., To the Glory of God: Mormon Essays on Great Issues—Environment, Commitment, Love, Peace, Youth, Man (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1972), 3-29.

"Similarly, we seem to have little to say in the Church about the worldwide extinction crisis, despite our doctrinal mandate to care for the nonhuman creatures which, like us, were designed to 'fi[ll] the measure of [their] creation' (D&C 88:19) and that also received God’s blessing/commandment to 'be fruitful, and multiply' (Moses 2:22)."

Other Sources
Bart H. Welling
Other Writings of Mormons
“'The Blood of Every Beast': Mormonism and the Question of the Animal" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011).

"How many nonhuman living souls would be allowed to live out their natural life spans if the 'forgotten verses' of Doctrine and Covenants 89 were restored to prominence, and how would the economies and ecologies of Mormon-populated areas adapt? How will Mormon animal theology and policy themselves adapt to pressures from within and without, including the rising financial, ecological, social, medical, and climate change-related costs of raising animals for food according to the factory farm and industrial slaughterhouse paradigm of meat production and consumption? What about the increasingly complex ethical challenges posed by animal testing, xenotransplantation of body parts from animals to humans, genetic engineering and plastic surgery resulting in human/ animal hybrids, and eye-opening scientific discoveries in the fields of animal communication, culture, and emotion? Finally, to return to one of this essay’s central concerns, is the ideal of the peaceable kingdom worth reviving as we work to prevent another era of 'hideous mistakes,' to borrow George Q. Cannon’s term—namely, cataclysmic extinctions?"

Other Sources
Bart H. Welling
Other Writings of Mormons
“'The Blood of Every Beast': Mormonism and the Question of the Animal" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011).

"Not only is animal life capable of happiness, but it is also included within the scope of His redeeming power, as taught in this uniquely LDS scripture: [D&C 29:23-25] ... Plainly, all forms of life identified in this verse have great value in the eyes of God, for they are the workmanship of His hand, and will be blessed by His redeeming power. This doctrine leads one to view plant and animal life differently, as living souls created by God."

Church Leaders
Marcus B. Nash
General Authorities
"Righteous Dominion and Compassion for the Earth." Speech at 18th Annual Stegner Center Symposium on 12 April, 2013.

"Since both plant and animal life are living souls, they are capable of experiencing happiness as they fulfill the measure of their creation."

Church Leaders
Marcus B. Nash
General Authorities
"Righteous Dominion and Compassion for the Earth." Speech at 18th Annual Stegner Center Symposium on 12 April, 2013.

“Prof. Pauls tells us . . . that 'six species of American birds are already extinct; fourteen other species are apparently doomed. Here are the next candidates for early extinction in this country: Trumpeter swan, whooping crane, roseate spoonbill, redbreasted sandpiper, sandpiper, bartramia, sandpiper, golden plover, dowitcher, willet, American egret, snowy egret, wood duck, sage grouse, prairie sharp-tailed grouse, pinnated grouse.' With these startling facts before us, is it not time that something be done by every organization in the world to discountenance extermination and favor protection of feathered beauties. . . . In all the teaching, the element of love for all of the creatures of the earth can be emphasized, and thus true religion imparted. ”

Church Leaders
David O. McKay
Presidents of the Church
Juvenile Instructor, Vol. 48 (May 1913), 311.

"Man's machinery makes things alike; God's machinery gives to things which appear alike a pleasing difference. . . . Endless variety is stamped upon the works of God's hands. There are no two productions of nature, whether animal, vegetable or mineral, that are exactly alike and all are crowned with a degree of polish and perfection that cannot be obtained by ignorant man in his most exquisite mechanical productions."

Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 9:369-70

"God has given this great variety of intelligence. He has also given this great variety of forms—that eternal variety which we see upon this earth, not only among human beings, but in every class of all the creations of God; and they are all designed to be preserved to all eternity. None of them were made to be destroyed, except those that do not abide the law given them. The earth will abide its creation, and will be counted worthy of receiving the blessings designed for it, and will ultimately roll back into the presence of God who formed it and established it mineral, vegetable, and animal kingdoms. These will all be retained upon the earth, come forth in the resurrection, and abide for ever and for ever."

Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 8:8, March 4, 1860

Yea, verily I say unto you, in that day when the Lord shall come, he shall reveal all things—Things which have passed, and hidden things which no man knew, things of the earth, by which it was made, and the purpose and the end thereof—Things most precious, things that are above, and things that are beneath, things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven.

Doctrine and Covenants
Doctrine and Covenants
Scriptures
D&C 101:32-34

Q. What are we to understand by the sounding of the trumpets, mentioned in the 8th chapter of Revelation? A. We are to understand that as God made the world in six days, and on the seventh day he finished his work, and sanctified it, and also formed man out of the dust of the earth, even so, in the beginning of the seventh thousand years will the Lord God sanctify the earth, and complete the salvation of man, and judge all things, and shall redeem all things, except that which he hath not put into his power, when he shall have sealed all things, unto the end of all things; and the sounding of the trumpets of the seven angels are the preparing and finishing of his work, in the beginning of the seventh thousand years—the preparing of the way before the time of his coming.

Doctrine and Covenants
Doctrine and Covenants
Scriptures
D&C 77:12

"Brother Cox has a deeper motivation for saving forests than finding new types of medicine. He believes taking care of the earth shows respect for 'that . . . God who created the heavens and the earth, and all things that in them are' (Morm. 9:11)."

Other Sources
Anne Billings
Church Magazines
"Paul Cox—Preserving God’s Creations" in Nov 1998 Liahona.

"Brothers and sisters, if we truly love the Artist, let us not slash His painting. President David O. McKay taught that if we are to be great, we must reverence Deity and all things associated with Deity. To the degree that we believe the earth is associated with Deity, we must reverence the earth itself."

Other Sources
Paul Cox
Other Writings of Mormons
“Paley's Stone, Creationism, and Conservation,” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 33–42.

"[LDS members] are generally able to affirm and dismiss [the reverence-for-nature tradition] in one doublethink. There is a poetic truth about it, but most people today let scientific truth guide their thinking, and science teaches us to regard the earth as a lifeless object. . . . This is not to say that Mormons are less environmentally responsible than other groups, only that their environmental consciousness no longer embraces some of the creative teachings of their early leaders."

Other Sources
David Grandy
Other Writings of Mormons
"Heaven-Earth Wedges: The Mormon Experience," Proteus: A Journal of Ideas 15, no. 2 (1998): 59-60, 64.

"If Mormons are serious about ending inequality and they are serious about restoring dignity to the lives of the most poor and the most vulnerable in society, as the law of consecration demands, then they should be equally serious about respecting the creation as God's, understanding property as contingent, avoiding overconsumption in all of its forms, and honoring and protecting the sacred sources of physical life."

Other Sources
George Handley
Other Writings of Mormons
“Mormon Views of Environmental Stewardship” in Routledge Handbook on Religion and Ecology, edited by Mary Evelyn Tucker, John Grim, and Willis Jenkins. 97-106.

"We have eyes and see not, for that which we cannot appreciate or admire we are largely blind to, no matter how beautiful or inspiring it may be. As children of God, it is our duty to appreciate and worship Him in His creations. If we would associate all that is truly good and beautiful in life with thoughts of Him, we would be able to trace His handiwork throughout all nature."

Church Leaders
Joseph F. Smith
Presidents of the Church
Juvenile Instructor, 39:627-28, October 15, 1904.

And when forty years were expired, there appeared to [Moses] in the wilderness of mount Sinai an angel of the Lord in a flame of fire in a bush.

New Testament
Acts
Scriptures
Acts 7:30

"God declared the Creation to be 'very good.' When we care for and reverence His creations (including our fellow beings), we show love and respect for Him. Gratitude in turn brings additional blessings. The beauty of the earth goes beyond the surface to penetrate the careful observer's soul: 'That which is of God inviteth and enticeth to do good continually' (Moroni 7:13). Reverence and gratitude for the earth lead to increased faith in a Creator who provides a wonderfully beautiful and awesome place for His children to live."

Other Sources
Danielle Montague-Judd
Other Writings of Mormons
“How Can Church Members Increase Their Environmental Awareness?” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 141–53.

"By modern revelation the Lord has commanded that on the Sabbath we 'rest from [our] labors' and 'pay [our] devotions unto the Most High' and that on this day we 'do none other thing' (D&C 59:10, 13). When we keep this commandment of our Creator, we qualify for His promised blessings. He who created us knows what patterns of behavior will allow us to achieve our maximum physical and spiritual performance, and He has given us commandments designed to guide us into that behavior. When we honor the Sabbath day, we separate ourselves from most of the world, but we are blessed richly for it."

Church Leaders
Dallin H. Oaks
General Authorities
"Push Back Against the World," BYU-Hawaii commencement, Feb 25, 2017.

Wherefore, go to, and call servants, that we may labor diligently with our might in the vineyard, that we may prepare the way, that I may bring forth again the natural fruit, which natural fruit is good and the most precious above all other fruit.

Book of Mormon
Jacob
Scriptures
Jacob 5:61

For behold, are we not all beggars? Do we not all depend upon the same Being, even God, for all the substance which we have, for both food and raiment, and for gold, and for silver, and for all the riches which we have of every kind?

Book of Mormon
Mosiah
Scriptures
Mosiah 4:19

For it is expedient that I, the Lord, should make every man accountable, as a steward over earthly blessings, which I have made and prepared for my creatures.

Doctrine and Covenants
Doctrine and Covenants
Scriptures
D&C 104:13

I, the Lord, stretched out the heavens, and built the earth, my very handiwork; and all things therein are mine.

Doctrine and Covenants
Doctrine and Covenants
Scriptures
D&C 104:14

Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwelleth in you? If any man defile the temple of God, him shall God destroy; for the temple of God is holy, which temple ye are.

New Testament
1 Corinthians
Scriptures
1 Corinthians 3:16-17

What? know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost which is in you, which ye have of God, and ye are not your own? For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God's.

New Testament
1 Corinthians
Scriptures
1 Corinthians 6:19-20

We then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves.

New Testament
Romans
Scriptures
Romans 15:1

The heaven, even the heavens, are the Lord’s: but the earth hath he given to the children of men.

Old Testament
Psalms
Scriptures
Psalms 115:16

"God has made us responsible for the earth and all living things. How well are we doing?"

Other Sources
G. Michael Alder
Church Magazines
"Earth—A Gift of Gladness" in July 1991 Ensign.

"At one time, there may have been reason to be skeptical about the idea that we are damaging the earth on a global scale. But no longer. The evidence is mounting that we are doing ourselves and our mortal home serious damage."

Other Sources
G. Michael Alder
Church Magazines
"Earth—A Gift of Gladness" in July 1991 Ensign.

"The Lord is an ample provider—but he did not plan that we waste the gifts he has given us. The scriptures make it clear that we have dominion over the earth, but they also make it clear what that dominion means: We are to care for our planetary home and use its resources wisely. It was never intended that we abuse it."

Other Sources
G. Michael Alder
Church Magazines
"Earth—A Gift of Gladness" in July 1991 Ensign.

"Can Heavenly Father be any less pleased with this willful destruction of nature than when we break the Word of Wisdom? Certainly, if we are to become like him, we must begin to master the skills necessary to preserve and encourage the processes of life. It seems to me that part of our responsibility as caretakers for the earth is to learn about those processes and take advantage of opportunities to protect our world’s resources."

Other Sources
G. Michael Alder
Church Magazines
"Earth—A Gift of Gladness" in July 1991 Ensign.

"We know that each of us is a child of God, that the earth is our stewardship as well as proving ground. Yet our children are being exposed to views of man as a beast, of pollution as inevitable and irreversible, of cooperation as futile. Will they be prepared to refute those influences, not necessarily with the knowledge of a scientist, but with the testimony of the Spirit, acquired through personal, significant involvement with the Lord and his creations?"

Other Sources
Sharon Dequer
Church Magazines
"Discovering Nature" in June 1977 Ensign.

"It seems to me that by virtue of living upon the earth we shoulder two responsibilities. The first is to care for our beautiful home."

Other Sources
Mark J. Nielsen
Church Magazines
"The Wonder of Creation," March 2004 Ensign.

"At the Creation of the world God placed Adam and Eve as caretakers, with dominion over 'every living thing that moveth upon the earth,' and gave them instructions to 'replenish the earth, and subdue it' (Abr. 4:28). The earth, then, was created for us and given into our care. It is within our power to do with it what we like, but since it is God who entrusted it to us, it is to Him we shall answer for what we choose to do."

Other Sources
Mark J. Nielsen
Church Magazines
"The Wonder of Creation," March 2004 Ensign.

"Words that come to mind from the story of the Creation in Genesis chapter 1 are dominion and subdue. Sometimes these words conjure up images of an ultimate rule over powerless subjects. But no gift or station granted to us by God comes without responsibilities and expectations. Proper dominion over nature requires us to use the earth’s resources wisely."

Other Sources
Mark J. Nielsen
Church Magazines
"The Wonder of Creation," March 2004 Ensign.

"[T]he care of the earth is our most ancient and most worthy and, after all, our most pleasing responsibility. To cherish what remains of it, and to foster its renewal, is our only legitimate hope."

Other Sources
Wendell Berry
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
The Unsettling of America, pg 14

"The ecological teaching of the Bible is simply inescapable: God made the world because He wanted it made. He thinks the world is good, and He loves it. It is His world; He has never relinquished title to it. And He has never revoked the conditions, bearing on His gift to us of the use of it, that oblige us to take excellent care of it."

Other Sources
Wendell Berry
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
What Are People For? (1990), pg. 98.

"The destruction of the human environment is extremely serious, not only because God has entrusted the world to us men and women, but because human life is itself a gift which must be defended from various forms of debasement."

Other Sources
Pope Francis
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Encyclical Letter Laudato Si': On Care for Our Common Home (24 May 2015)

"An awareness of the relationship between God and humankind brings a fuller sense of the importance of the relationship between human beings and the natural environment, which is God's creation and which God entrusted to us to guard with wisdom and love."

Other Sources
Orthodox Church Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew & Pope John Paul II
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
"Steering the Earth Toward Our Children's Future," in Moral Ground: Ethical Action for a Planet in Peril, ed. Kathleen Dean Moore and Michael P. Nelson, pg. 52.

"Brother Cox has a deeper motivation for saving forests than finding new types of medicine. He believes taking care of the earth shows respect for 'that . . . God who created the heavens and the earth, and all things that in them are'" (Morm. 9:11).

Other Sources
Anne Billings
Church Magazines
"Paul Cox—Preserving God’s Creations" in Nov 1998 Liahona.

"The Bible speaks of man having dominion over the earth (Psalm 8:4), but the scriptures also warn us to be wise in how we exercise that dominion. It is no small thing to be made the caretaker of the Lord's house and overseer of His creations. We may not be doing very well in that regard. Last month, a thousand scientists from more than 50 countries produced a Global Biodiversity Assessment. It concluded that at least 4,000 plants and 5,400 animals are now threatened with extinction, and the rate of extinction in recent years is 50 to 100 times that of the past."

Other Sources
Church News
Official Church Outlets
"Dominion Over the Earth," Church News Archive, February 17, 1996, p. 16.

"However, just as God ordained these creatures for our use, He makes it plain what the boundaries of that use are. Continuing from the above verses we read: 'But it is not given that one man should possess that which is above another, wherefore the world lieth in sin. And wo be unto man sheddeth blood or that wasteth flesh and hath no need' (D&C 49:20-21)."

Other Sources
Jane Birch
Other Writings of Mormons
Discovering the Word of Wisdom, pg 82

"God has given us rich abundance, but He also has commanded us to be wise stewards. He has ordained the use of animals to sustain our lives in times of need, but we are told to use judgment and to not shed blood when there is no need. Furthermore, this injunction is not just a modern commandment. In the beginning, God gave our first parents a diet of plants. In the Bible account, consuming the flesh of animals is introduced only after the flood destroyed the vegetation on the earth."

Other Sources
Jane Birch
Other Writings of Mormons
Discovering the Word of Wisdom, pg 82

"The Lord gave humans dominion over the animals, just as He gives parents dominion over their children. We are blessed with this opportunity, and we are privileged to act in the place of God to serve those weaker than ourselves. This is a sacred stewardship for which we will be held accountable."

Other Sources
Jane Birch
Other Writings of Mormons
Discovering the Word of Wisdom, pg 83

"Mormons, along with the rest of Western civilization, are beginning to engage in a serious reflection on what our tradition has to say about the earth and our moral responsibilities toward it and its creatures."

Other Sources
Jason M. Brown
Other Writings of Mormons
"Whither Mormon Environmental Theology?" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011)

"Stewardship emphasizes God's goodness in creating the world. Because human beings benefit from that goodness, we are obliged to make prudent and wise use of its bounty and to safeguard human health."

Other Sources
Jason M. Brown
Other Writings of Mormons
"Whither Mormon Environmental Theology?" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011)

"Of all these principles, stewardship seems to be mentioned most often by essayists who write about how their theology informs their views on environmentalism. Why is this such an important concept to Mormons? One reason might be their belief that, as Eugene England put it, 'all God’s creations—including animals, plants, even, it seems, the rocks themselves—have a spiritual existence and identity that can be loved and must be respected.' As Adam and Eve were instructed in the creation story, humankind received the charge to care for all of creation. A second reason may lie in Mormonism’s agrarian roots and the way in which early members of the Church were so intimately connected to the land. They knew firsthand the importance of stewardship for their personal survival."

Other Sources
Gary C. Bryner
Other Writings of Mormons
"Theology and Ecology: Religious Belief and Environmental Stewardship," in BYU Studies 49, no. 3 (2010)