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"[George Q.] Cannon explained that the only successful technique to catch the wild horses was by the lasso rope. But, he said, 'this is a very cruel way of catching horses, and ought never to be practiced by people like us.' President Cannon contended that lassoing horses was 'fit only for savages' and a 'rude, barbarous people, like the Californians were when we settled this valley.' The practice was further criticized in the editorial because the horses were 'ruined' by the operation. The use of spurs on the horses was also condemned because it was 'very cruel.' Expressing disgust with the use of spurs, George Q. Cannon stated, 'They treated the poor dumb creatures, which God had given them as though they had no feeling.' 'Such conduct is brutal and sinful,' the editorial continued, 'and punishment in some form will fall upon those who indulge in it.' Further developing the concept that man would be held accountable by God for his treatment of animals, Cannon said cruelty to animals was 'very sinful.' He asked the question, 'Will a man who has the Spirit of God be cruel or unkind to dumb creatures because they are in his power?' He answered with an emphatic 'No.' Indeed, he wrote, 'the spirit of God fills men and boys with love and compassion' and thus they would no sooner hurt an animal than they would a human companion."

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) [Page 45, footnote: Juvenile Instructor, VI (May 13, 1871), 76.]

"Editorially, President Cannon continued to write on zoophilic topics. One editorial decried the 'far too general' disposition of Latter-day Saints to 'kill wild animals and birds, and every insect which crosses their path.' He asked, 'Why there should be such eagerness to kill these creatures.' If men hunted game 'because they have pleasure in taking their lives,' President Cannon suggested the hunter imagine himself in the position of the hunted. The editor admitted a 'great difference between animals and human beings,' but declared all were given life by God and so should be respected and treated with kindness. Animals were meant to be used by man for food, according to Cannon, but only with 'prudence and thanksgiving and not wastefully.' He contended that too often animals' lives were 'very much wasted to gratify the hunting propensity of some men.' He explained that if humans needed animals for food the 'Lord is not displeased if they kill it.' On the other hand, Cannon emphasized, if people hunted for the 'mere pleasure of killing' then sin was committed. Cannon then referred to prophecies concerning the time when 'wild and ferocious' animals would dwell together in kindness. But, Cannon warned, before that day would come, men must 'cease their war upon the animals, the reptiles and the insects.' In the peaceful state looked for in the future, Cannon promised that animals would be harmless and 'universal peace will prevail.'"

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) [Page 50, footnote: Juvenile Instructor, XXIV (December 1, 1889), 548-9.]

"At the age of seventy-two and after having served as a counselor to three Presidents of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, George Q. Cannon was still writing about the humane treatment of animals. One of his last editorials began with an expressed doubt as to the success or usefulness of bounties on predators. He specifically attacked the hunting of hawks . . . The crow and the coyote were likewise defended by editor Cannon. Basically his argument in the editorial was that 'efforts to destroy the equilibrium [of nature] are generally disastrous.'"

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) [Page 54, footnote: Juvenile Instructor, (1899), 492-3.]

"A short announcement of Humane Day in 1911 commented favorably on recent legislation to protect animals in the United States. However, the 'editorial thought' was that while the passage of laws was helpful, education was the more effective approach to avoid cruelty to animals. It was stated that kindness to animals should be 'a matter of principle, not law.' The editor suggested that children 'be taught from infancy to be kind and tender' to the animals under human care. Further, he stated: 'When every soul gets into the condition of mind that he will go out of his way to ease the suffering of a dumb animal, then many of the cruelties now complained of will disappear from the earth forever.'"

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) [Page 60, footnote: Juvenile Instructor, XLVI (February, 1911), 83.]

"The editorial stated that 'God in His wisdom has established a wonderful economic balance in the distribution of His creations' and man suffers whenever the balance is disturbed. Admitting that birds may eat fruit and grain, the writer held that 'the laborer is worthy of his hire.' Birds labored for the grower earlier in the spring by devouring insects, the writer commented, and if they ate some fruit for their sustenance, 'they are surely entitled to it.' The ecological concern of the writer was summarized by his statement: 'If we could understand all the purposes of God in His Wonderful creations, we could avoid diligently the dangers of disturbing the balance in the distribution of life which God has so wonderfully ordained.'"

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) [Page 63, footnote: Juvenile Instructor, L (June, 1915), 372-3.]

"The announcement [of Humane Day] read: 'The Deseret Sunday School Union Board have discussed the propriety of doing something in the direction of impressing the children with lessons concerning the proper treatment of animals, and have appointed Sunday, February 28th, as HUMANE DAY. In appointing this as Humane Day it is the design to have the usual services and lessons taken upon that day in the Sunday School, in their regular order; but that in addition to these, addresses be given by persons selected for this purpose, which will set forth in as forcible a manner as possible the propriety of being kind and considerate to the animal creation, especially those domestic animals with which children are most closely brought in contact. The object of these addresses will be to teach the children kindness, mercy, forbearance and love toward all the living creations of God.'"

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) [Pages 77-8, footnote: George Q. Cannon, "Topics for the Times," The Juvenile Instructor, XXIX (January15, 1897), 59.]

"An important program sponsored by the Primary organization in the Children's Friend was called the 'Kindness to Animals Club,' referred to frequently in the publication as 'KTA.' The announcement inviting Primary children to join the club was in the January, 1952 issue. On the top half of the page was a banner headline inviting all children to join: 'KINDNESS TO ANIMALS CLUB A BRAND NEW CLUB FOR ALL BOYS AND GIRLS, WILL YOU BE AN ACTIVE, LIVEWIRE MEMBER?' The invitation continued by asking: 'There are all kinds of clubs, but what could be more fun than to share in doing good and being kind to all animal life?' The instructions for joining the club were listed. A creed consisted of three promises to be pledged by each applicant: '1. I will feed my pets and take care of them as I should. 2. I will be kind to all animal life. 3. I will try to get others to do the same.' The KTA program gradually faded from notice after a full year of monthly attention. The last invitation to join was in the December, 1956, issue."

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) [Page 83, footnote: The Children's Friend, LI (January, 1952), 22.]

"Since my original research on the topic many years ago, my perception has not changed much. I still feel that the prophets and scriptures teach that people should treat animals kindly. However, people are more important than animals and it seems clear that men can use animals for assistance in travel, food, protection, and companionship. When necessary animals may be killed to protect people from their attacks. They may also be killed for food, but the scriptures implore us not to unless necessary to sustain our lives."

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) [Pages 89-90]

"President [George] Cannon was concerned that bounty laws were just an added enticement for people to participate in the spirit of destruction. In opposition, he defended many of the animals targeted by bounty laws."

Other Sources
Aaron Kelson
Other Writings of Mormons
"A Plea for the Horse": George Q. Cannon's Concern for Animal Welfare in Nineteenth Century America, BYU Studies Quarterly, Vol. 38, Issue 3, Article 4. p. 52

"He [Brigham Young] laid special emphasis on the importance of human esteem for the animal world, for one of the peculiar doctrines of the Latter-day Saints is that animals are living souls destined to participate in the resurrection as they did in the premortal existence."

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Brigham Young on the Environment," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; printed in Truman Madsen and Charles D. Tate, eds., To the Glory of God: Mormon Essays on Great Issues—Environment, Commitment, Love, Peace, Youth, Man (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1972), 3—29.

"LDS scripture clearly teaches that animals are 'living souls" (Moses 3:19) who existed before this earthly life and will be resurrected after death; as such, they should be killed only in situations where human survival depends on it."

Other Sources
Bart H. Welling
Other Writings of Mormons
“'The Blood of Every Beast': Mormonism and the Question of the Animal" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011).

"Similarly, we seem to have little to say in the Church about the worldwide extinction crisis, despite our doctrinal mandate to care for the nonhuman creatures which, like us, were designed to 'fi[ll] the measure of [their] creation' (D&C 88:19) and that also received God’s blessing/commandment to 'be fruitful, and multiply' (Moses 2:22)."

Other Sources
Bart H. Welling
Other Writings of Mormons
“'The Blood of Every Beast': Mormonism and the Question of the Animal" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011).

"As the Book of Mormon continues, the Lamanites’ violations of the Mosaic proscriptions against eating predators and consuming blood and meat that had not been prepared correctly, to say nothing of the unwritten cannibalism taboo, represent less a conscious rejection of Nephite faith traditions than an instinctual and progressively expanding taste for flesh. Again and again the Book of Mormon demonstrates that the interlinked and often coterminous boundaries between humans and beasts, Nephites and Lamanites, and sinners and saints are actually, in the American Promised Land, frighteningly porous liminal spaces that must be watched and guarded with great care."

Other Sources
Bart H. Welling
Other Writings of Mormons
“'The Blood of Every Beast': Mormonism and the Question of the Animal" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011).

"Without question, the animals that Lehi’s family eats have been 'ordained [by God] for the use of man'; eating meat saves Lehi’s family from 'famine and excess of hunger,' and they use meat 'sparingly' as well as 'with thanksgiving' (D&C 89:15, 12). Nephi undoubtedly goes about killing the animals 'with judgment, not to excess, neither by extortion' (D&C 59:20). Nephi’s unusual use of the word 'sweet' for the meat seems to indicate that, when the time comes for God to 'require' the blood of the animals at the family’s hands (JST Gen. 9:5), he will hold them as blameless as if they had eaten fruit. The adjective 'sweet' also calls to mind, perhaps deliberately, the verses in the King James translation of Genesis 1 where God articulates what animal theologian Andrew Linzey calls his 'original will for creation,' instructing Adam and Eve that they are to share fruit and other plant foods with animals as their only 'meat' (Gen. 1:29, 30)."

Other Sources
Bart H. Welling
Other Writings of Mormons
“'The Blood of Every Beast': Mormonism and the Question of the Animal" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011).

"Numerous accounts of Zion’s Camp demonstrate that one or both sides of the lesson—the millennial and the extortionary— bore immediate fruit in Joseph Smith’s colleagues’ improved treatment of animals. Echoes of the lesson can also be heard many years later in statements by Brigham Young, as well as by leaders who did not participate in Zion’s Camp, such as Joseph F. Smith and George Q. Cannon. In fact Cannon, a first counselor to Brigham Young, John Taylor, Wilford Woodruff, and Lorenzo Snow, was instrumental in advocating the humane treatment of animals and promoting a 'Humane Day' that was observed in LDS Sunday Schools every spring from 1897 to 1918. Cannon was interested in more than emulating non-LDS groups like the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals; as Aaron R. Kelson notes (quoting Cannon), his efforts were rooted in the millennial conviction that 'the time will come when man and animals which are now wild and ferocious will dwell together without hurting each other . . . But before this day comes men will have to cease their war upon the animals, the reptiles and the insects . . . When man becomes their true friend, they will learn to love and not to fear him. The Spirit of the Lord which will rest upon man will also be given to the animal creation—man will not hurt nor destroy, not even tigers and lions and wolves and snakes, and they will not harm him—and universal peace will prevail.”

Other Sources
Bart H. Welling
Other Writings of Mormons
“'The Blood of Every Beast': Mormonism and the Question of the Animal" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011).

"Then again, it is undoubtedly misleading to draw too sharp a divide between human self-interest and compassion for animals, in light not just of modern ecology but of Joseph Smith’s revelations on the materiality of spirit (D&C 131:7) and on the ways in which the fates of all living souls on earth are bound together, from creation to millennium to exaltation and beyond. Joseph Smith’s animal teachings, not excluding the killing of the squirrel, look remarkably consistent and even biocentric when compared with those of René Descartes, whose theories on the soullessness and a-rational status of animals (or 'beast-machines,' as he styled them) have authorized innumerable horrific acts of cruelty in the vivisection chamber and the animal testing lab, but who preferred keeping to a vegetarian diet for the sake of his own health."

Other Sources
Bart H. Welling
Other Writings of Mormons
“'The Blood of Every Beast': Mormonism and the Question of the Animal" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011).

"How many nonhuman living souls would be allowed to live out their natural life spans if the 'forgotten verses' of Doctrine and Covenants 89 were restored to prominence, and how would the economies and ecologies of Mormon-populated areas adapt? How will Mormon animal theology and policy themselves adapt to pressures from within and without, including the rising financial, ecological, social, medical, and climate change-related costs of raising animals for food according to the factory farm and industrial slaughterhouse paradigm of meat production and consumption? What about the increasingly complex ethical challenges posed by animal testing, xenotransplantation of body parts from animals to humans, genetic engineering and plastic surgery resulting in human/animal hybrids, and eye-opening scientific discoveries in the fields of animal communication, culture, and emotion? Finally, to return to one of this essay’s central concerns, is the ideal of the peaceable kingdom worth reviving as we work to prevent another era of 'hideous mistakes,' to borrow George Q. Cannon’s term—namely, cataclysmic extinctions?"

Other Sources
Bart H. Welling
Other Writings of Mormons
“'The Blood of Every Beast': Mormonism and the Question of the Animal" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011).

"Children should be taught that it is a duty to protect and care for the creatures that are in their charge; to see that they are fed and watered and housed, so that they will not suffer. They should not be overworked. They should not be beaten improperly or abused; but should be treated with kindness. A child that is cruel to an animal exhibits a bad disposition. He will be apt to grow up to be an unfeeling, cruel man. Therefore children should be taught to be merciful to the brute creation."

Church Leaders
George Q. Cannon
General Authorities
Juvenile Instructor 26:443, July 15, 1891

"Every child that is brought into contact with animals should be taught, by parents and by all who attempt to instruct the young, that it is a very great sin in the sight of the Almighty for the dumb creation to be treated with cruelty or even with neglect. A merciful man is merciful to his beast."

Church Leaders
George Q. Cannon
General Authorities
Juvenile Instructor 34:113, Feb 15, 1899

"The Lord has given animals, fowls and fish to man for his use. They are placed under man's control, to be used for food with prudence and thanksgiving and not wastefully. But we have heard of animal life being very much wasted to gratify the hunting propensity of some men. This is wrong. When people can use game of any kind for food, and they stand in need of it, the Lord is not displeased if they kill it. When, however, they hunt it for the mere pleasure of killing, then sin is committed."

Church Leaders
George Q. Cannon
General Authorities
Quoted in Richard D. Stratton, ed., Kindness to Animals and Caring for the Earth: Selections from the Sermons and Writings of Latter-day Saint Church Leaders (Portland, Ore.: Inkwater Press, 2004), 31.

"There can be no doubt in the mind of any person who believes in the God of heaven that He will hold man accountable for any ill treatment of the creatures He was placed under his control, and those who misuse or treat them with cruelty will be called to an account for such acts. It is not our acts to our fellow man alone that we shall be called to an account for, but our acts to the creations of our Father in heaven. These animals are His, He created them, and they are not outside of the reach of His love and care, and they cannot be badly treated with impunity. This is the lesson that should be impressed deeply upon the minds of the young, and when they are awakened to realize this they will be more humane to the animals they have in their keeping and be more likely to treat them with consideration and kindness."

Church Leaders
George Q. Cannon
General Authorities
Juvenile Instructor, XXIX (January 15, 1897), 59.

"We should by every means in our power impress upon the rising generation the value of life, and how dreadful a sin it is to take life. The lives of animals even should be held far more sacred than they are. Young people should be taught to be very merciful to the brute creation and not to take life wantonly or for sport. The practice of hunting and killing game merely for sport should be frowned upon and not encouraged among us. God has created the fowls and the beasts for man's convenience and comfort, and for his consumption at proper times and under proper circumstances; but he does not justify men in wantonly killing those creatures which He has made and with which He has supplied the earth."

Church Leaders
George Q. Cannon
General Authorities
Juvenile Instructor 31:218-219, April 1, 1896

"We say again such cruelty as many boys and men practice towards animals, is very sinful, and they ought to be ashamed of their conduct. Will a man or boy who has the Spirit of God be cruel or unkind to dumb creatures because they are in his power? No, for the Spirit of God fills men and boys with love and compassion, and they would as soon think of abusing their companions as they would of abusing a horse, ox, or any other animal."

Church Leaders
George Q. Cannon
General Authorities
Juvenile Instructor 6:76, May 13, 1871

"Where we treat our animals in an inhuman manner we not only displease the Lord and are guilty of sin toward the animal creation, but we also set an exceedingly bad example to the rising generation, one which is very likely to have a bad effect on their whole character. Such examples harden the hearts of the children, and stifle the feeling of kindness and mercy that ought to be cultivated."

Church Leaders
George Q. Cannon
General Authorities
Juvenile Instructor 34:113, Feb. 15, 1899

“Children who are trained to respect the rights of the lower animals will . . . respect human rights and become good citizens.”

Church Leaders
George Q. Cannon
General Authorities
Juvenile Instructor 35 (Feb. 15, 1900), 124.

"In verse 11 of 2 Nephi 5, Nephi also records, 'We began to raise flocks, and herds, and animals of every kind.' This is an element of a happy life to which many will readily relate. Animals—be they horses, cats, dogs, hamsters, or turtles—touch us deeply and promote our emotional well-being. Given affection and care, they return affection and care generously and consistently. People whose lives include relationships with animals are usually happier. For me at least, heaven will not be heaven unless the animals kingdom is part of God's kingdom."

Church Leaders
Marlin K. Jensen
General Authorities
"Living After the Manner of Happiness," Ensign, Dec. 2002.

"I do not think that many ever suppose that animals are going to be resurrected. When God touched Elijah's eyes, and he looked on the mountain, he saw chariots and horses, and men by thousands and millions. Where did they come from? There is nothing on this earth but what came from heaven, and it grew and was created before it grew on this earth: the Bible says so."

Church Leaders
Heber C. Kimball
General Authorities
Journal of Discourses 5:137, Aug. 2, 1857

“Let [the animals] rest: they are as good as we are in their sphere of action; they honor their calling, and we do not, when we abuse them: they have the same life in them that you have, and we should not hurt them. It hurts them to whip them, as bad as it does you; and when they are drawing as though their daylights would fly out of them, you must whip, whip, whip. Is there religion in that? No; it is an abuse of God's creation that he has created for us.”

Church Leaders
Heber C. Kimball
General Authorities
Journal of Discourses 5:137, Aug. 2, 1857

"[God] knows what course to pursue to restore mankind to their pristine excellency and primitive vigor, and health; and he has appointed the word of wisdom as one of the engines to bring about this thing, to remove the beastly appetites, the murderous disposition and the vitiated taste of man; to restore his body to health, and vigour, promote peace between him and the brute creation. . . .Let men attend to [the Word of Wisdom], let them use the things ordained of God; let them be sparing of the life of animals; ‘it is pleasing saith the Lord that flesh be used only in times of winter, or of famine’—and why to be used in famine? because all domesticated animals would naturally die, and may as well be made use of by man, as not."

Church Leaders
Hyrum Smith
General Authorities
Times and Seasons 3, no. 1 (June 1, 1842): 799-801.

"Animals do have souls—that is to say, each animal is a spirit and a body, these together constituting the soul; and the same is true of the trees, plants and flowers. They were not formed for any merely temporary purpose, and are to be eternally perpetuated."

Church Leaders
Orson F. Whitney
General Authorities
Improvement Era 30:844, Aug. 1927

"A priesthood holder is kind. One who is kind is sympathetic and gentle with others. He is considerate of others' feelings and courteous in his behavior. He has a helpful nature. Kindness pardons others' weaknesses and faults. Kindness is extended to all—to the aged and the young, to animals, to those of low station as well as the high. These are the true attributes of the divine nature."

Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
Ensign, p. 47, Nov. 1986

[In reference to sound stewardship practice on Church-owned lands:] "And may I remind you that it generally takes several times as much land to produce a given amount of food when grains are fed to livestock and we consume the meat. Let us be careful not to overdo beef cattle and other livestock projects on our welfare farms."

Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
"Prepare Ye," Ensign, January 1974, 69.

"According to present appearances, we may expect grasshoppers to eat up nearly all our crops. But if we have provisions enough to last us another year, we can say to the grasshoppers—these creatures of God—you are welcome. I have never yet had a feeling to drive them from one plant in my garden; but I look upon them as the armies of the Lord."

Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 12:121

"Animals also possess degrees of love; some greater love, perhaps, than intelligence. Some animals are remarkable indeed for the wonderful development of love and devotion they possess and show towards men. They are so acute in the sense of their affections that they seem to perceive the feelings of their master in advance of his expressions."

Church Leaders
Joseph F. Smith
Presidents of the Church
Juvenile Instructor 48:84-85, Feb 1913

"Also during Joseph F. Smith's time as Church President, superintendent of the Sunday Schools, and editor of the Juvenile Instructor, a special editorial on 'Humane Day' was published. Signatures accompanying the editorial were of the Sunday School superintendency, which included the future President of the Church, David O. McKay, and Stephen L. Richards, later counselor in the First Presidency to David O. McKay. "This same editorial was repeated by Heber J. Grant, successor to Joseph F. Smith as President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and editor of the Juvenile Instructor. Thus three Presidents of the Church gave their endorsement and published this important statement on zoophily in the Church. Because of its unique status this document is also reproduced in full. "'What is it to be humane to the beasts of the fields and the birds of the air? It is more than to be considerate of the animal life entrusted to our care. It is a grateful appreciation of God's creations. It is the lesson of divine law. To Him all life is a sacred creation for the use of His children. Do we stand beside Him in our tender regard for life? "Our sense of appreciation should be quickened by a desire to understand divine purposes, and to keep the balance of animal life adjusted to the needs of creation. Man in his wanton disregard of r a sacred duty has been reckless of life. He has destroyed it with an indifference to the evil results it would entail upon the earth. Birds have been uselessly slaughtered, and pests have sprung up as a consequence to plague the people of the world. We are a part of all life and should study carefully our relationship to it. We should be in sympathy with it, and not allow our prejudices to create a desire for its destruction. The unnecessary destruction of life begets a spirit of destruction which grows within the soul. It lives by what it feeds upon and robs man of the love that he should have for the works of God. It hardens the heart of man and makes him prey upon the social welfare which he should feel for the happiness and advancement of his fellow man. "The unnecessary destruction of life is a distinct spiritual loss to the human family. Men cannot worship the Creator and look with careless indifference upon his creation. The love of all life helps man to the enjoyment of a better life. It exalts the spiritual nature of those in need of divine favor. The wanton destruction of life reacts upon the human family. There is something of the law of compensation which makes criminals injure and destroy life. Men who are unsympathetic toward the life of domestic animals entrusted to them usually receive the reward of the cruelty by the dumb animals which they maltreat. Love begets love in all creation, and nature responds bounteously to the tender treatment of man. "Men learn more easily in sympathetic relationships of all life than they do in the seclusion of human interest. Their minds are more open to the manifestations of that inspiration which all nature gives to those who lovingly enjoy her. Wisdom and virtue come from the animal and vegetable world which carries with it a spiritual as well as a material blessing. Nature helps us to see and understand God. To all His creations we owe an allegiance of service and a profound admiration. Man should be kind to the animals which serve him both directly and indirectly. An angry word or a brutal blow wounds the heart from which it comes. Love of nature is akin to the love of God; the two are inseparable.'"

Other Sources
Gerald E. Jones
Other Writings of Mormons
Animals and the Church (2003) [Pages 64-5, footnote: Juvenile Instructor, LIII (April, 1918), 182-3; Juvenile Instructor, LXII (April, 1927), 190-1.]

"All creatures exist in their own particular spheres . . . We feel a kinship with the animals—and we should. We are going to live with them in the eternities. We should love the critters, and they will learn to love us."

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
Of All Things! Classic Quotations from Hugh Nibley, compiled by Gary P. Gillum

"President Joseph F Smith wrote, 'where the use of guns and other deadly weapons is prohibited by law . . . the animals and birds are becoming as tame and fearless of human beings, their deadliest foes, as domestic animals and barnyard fowls . . . The birds do not fly away with fright at the approach of men; even the brown, cinnamon and grizzly bears are friendly, some of them so tame as to take their food from the hands of men—all because, for a few years, they have not been hunted, shot at and slaughtered by the lords of creation.' Thus it may be seen, in harmony with the sentiments expressed by the Prophet Joseph Smith, that if man did right, were humane and merciful toward animals, they would, in time, lose their fear and dread of him, and would also lose many, if not all, of their own bad traits."

Other Sources
Bart H. Welling
Other Writings of Mormons
“'The Blood of Every Beast': Mormonism and the Question of the Animal" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011).

"The time will come when man and animals which are now wild and ferocious will dwell together without hurting each other. The prophets have foretold this with great plainness. But before this day comes men will have to cease their war upon the animals, the reptiles and the insects. At the present time every one of these flee from his presence with fear; they feel that if he can reach them by his weapons, he will kill them. The Lord gives them knowledge enough to take care of the lives which He has given them, and He, doubtless, teaches them to shun man. But when man becomes their true friend, they will learn to love and not to fear him. The Spirit of the Lord which will rest upon man will also be given to the animal creation—man will not hurt nor destroy, not even tigers and lions and wolves and snakes, and they will not harm him—and universal peace will prevail."

Church Leaders
George Q. Cannon
General Authorities
Juvenile Instructor 24:549, Dec. 1, 1889

“Prof. Pauls tells us . . . that 'six species of American birds are already extinct; fourteen other species are apparently doomed. Here are the next candidates for early extinction in this country: Trumpeter swan, whooping crane, roseate spoonbill, redbreasted sandpiper, sandpiper, bartramia, sandpiper, golden plover, dowitcher, willet, American egret, snowy egret, wood duck, sage grouse, prairie sharp-tailed grouse, pinnated grouse.' With these startling facts before us, is it not time that something be done by every organization in the world to discountenance extermination and favor protection of feathered beauties. . . . In all the teaching, the element of love for all of the creatures of the earth can be emphasized, and thus true religion imparted. ”

Church Leaders
David O. McKay
Presidents of the Church
Juvenile Instructor, Vol. 48 (May 1913), 311.

"I never could see why a man should be imbued with a blood-thirsty desire to kill and destroy animal life. I have known men—and they still exist among us—who enjoy what is, to them, the ‘sport’ of hunting birds and slaying them by the hundreds, and who will come in after a day’s sport, boasting of how many harmless birds they have had the skill to slaughter, and day after day, during the season when it is lawful for men to hunt and kill (the birds having had a season of protection and not apprehending danger) go out by scores or hundreds, and you may hear their guns early in the morning on the day of the opening, as if great armies had met in battle; and the terrible work of slaughtering the innocent birds goes on . . . I do not believe any man should kill animals or birds unless he needs them for food, and then he should not kill innocent little birds that are not intended for food for man. I think it is wicked for men to thirst in their souls to kill almost everything which possesses animal life. It is wrong, and I have been surprised at prominent men whom I have seen whose very souls seemed to be athirst for the shedding of animal blood."

Church Leaders
Joseph F. Smith
Presidents of the Church
Gospel Doctrine, 5th ed., Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1939, pp. 265–66

"Kindness begets kindness and brings results . . . Love, intelligently and humanely applied, has not only produced gentleness in the horse, but has contributed to the intelligence of the animal. And why does kindness contribute to intelligence? Because kindness is an attribute of intelligence. And like begets like. We know that restraint and self-control are necessary to the possession of the spirit of kindness, and these command the attention and submission of all domestic animals . . . [W]hy have the words of Jesus of Nazareth moved men to work and suffer, to think and feel as the words of no other man have done? It is the love, the intelligence, as well as the authority in which they were spoken. All nature responds to love. From love comes contentment, and the highest form of service."

Church Leaders
Joseph F. Smith
Presidents of the Church
Juvenile Instructor 48:84-85, Feb 1913

"Thus it may be seen, in harmony with the sentiments expressed by the Prophet Joseph Smith, that if man did right, were humane and merciful toward animals, they would, in time, lose their fear and dread of him, and would also lose many, if not all, of their own bad traits. Animals are not cruel and vicious just for the fun of it, as is too often the case with man, but generally they are prone to destroy life only to appease their own hunger. It will be a blessed day when mankind shall accept and abide by the Christlike sentiment expressed by one of the poets in the following words: 'Take not away the life you cannot give, For all things have an equal right to live.'"

Church Leaders
Joseph F. Smith
Presidents of the Church
"Kindness to Animals," Juvenile Instructor (February, 1912), 78-9.

“When I visited, a few years ago, the Yellowstone National Park, and saw in the streams and the beautiful lakes, birds swimming quite fearless of man, allowing passers-by to approach them as closely almost as tame birds, and apprehending no fear of them, and when I saw droves of beautiful deer [feeding] along the side of the road, as fearless of the presence of men as any domestic animal, it filled my heart with a degree of peace and joy that seemed to be almost a foretaste of that period hoped for when there shall be none to hurt and none to molest in all the land, especially among all the inhabitants of Zion. These same birds, if they were to visit other regions, inhabited by man, would, on account of their tameness, doubtless become more easily a prey to the gunner. The same may be said of those beautiful creatures—the deer and the antelope. If they should wander out of the park, beyond the protection that is established there for these animals, they would become, of course, an easy prey to those who were seeking their lives. I never could see why a man should be imbued with a blood-thirsty desire to kill and destroy animal life. I have known men—and they still exist among us—who enjoy what is, to them, the ‘sport’ of hunting birds and slaying them by the hundreds, and who will come in after a day’s sport, boasting of how many harmless birds they have had the skill to slaughter, and day after day, during the season when it is lawful for men to hunt and kill (the birds having had a season of protection and not apprehending danger) go out by scores or hundreds, and you may hear their guns early in the morning on the day of the opening, as if great armies had met in battle; and the terrible work of slaughtering the innocent birds goes on. I do not believe any man should kill animals or birds unless he needs them for food, and then he should not kill innocent little birds that are not intended for food for man. I think it is wicked for men to thirst in their souls to kill almost everything which possesses animal life. It is wrong, and I have been surprised at prominent men whom I have seen whose very souls seemed to be athirst for the shedding of animal blood.”

Church Leaders
Joseph F. Smith
Presidents of the Church
Gospel Doctrine, 5th ed., Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1939, pp. 265–66.

“The Spirit of the Lord and keys of the priesthood hold power over all animated beings. When Father Adam transgressed the law, he did not fall at once from the presence of the Lord . . . Men continued to sin and degenerate from generation to generation . . . During this time the earth and all creation groaned in sin, and enmity increased, and the lives of men and beasts decreased . . . In this dispensation the keys . . . will be restored, and we are to return into the favor and presence of the Lord . . . Cease hostility with the serpents and lay aside all enmity and treat all animals kindly.”

Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
The Journal of Brigham: Brigham Young's Own Story in His Own Words, comp. Lee Nelson, pg. 152.

"What a sin it is to the Latter-day Saints, if they did but know it, to abuse their stock—their cattle, milk cows and horses! Through the summer they will work and use them, and in the winter turn them out to live or die as they can, taking no care of that which God has given them. Were it not for the ignorance of the people, the Lord would curse them for such things."

Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 15:227

"Paul, Amulek, and other prophets had taught that Jesus Christ’s atonement had ended the need for animal sacrifice, but Joseph Smith’s Abrahamic test of his followers exemplifies, along with an unerring feel for what it takes to destabilize ossified ways of knowing and perceiving the world, a mature understanding of the deeply entrenched role of violence toward animals in human culture: an awareness that, in practice, animal sacrifice has never ended, and that the Millennium will not come to pass unless we confront our tendency to 'make war upon . . . the brute creation' as directly as possible."

Other Sources
Bart H. Welling
Other Writings of Mormons
“'The Blood of Every Beast': Mormonism and the Question of the Animal" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 44, no. 2 (Summer 2011).

"What did Isaiah say [Isaiah 65:21-25]? Before you get through asking, I will answer. The lion, as well as the lamb, these animals that now are so filled with vicious habits will then be at peace, and so it says here there will be no enmity between man and beast, and we will not delight to go off and kill deer when that time comes."

Church Leaders
Joseph Fielding Smith
Presidents of the Church
The Signs of the Times, p. 36

“We crossed the Embarras river and encamped on a small branch of the same about one mile west. In pitching my tent we found three massasaugas or prairie rattlesnakes, which the brethren were about to kill, but I said, ‘Let them alone—don’t hurt them! How will the serpent ever lose his venom, while the servants of God possess the same disposition and continue to make war upon it? Men must become harmless, before the brute creation; and when men lose their vicious dispositions and cease to destroy the animal race, the lion and the lamb can dwell together, and the sucking child can play with the serpent in safety.’ The brethren took the serpents carefully on sticks and carried them across the creek. I exhorted the brethren not to kill a serpent, bird, or an animal of any kind during our journey unless it became necessary in order to preserve ourselves from hunger.”

Church Leaders
Joseph Smith, Jr.
Presidents of the Church
Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith, sel. Joseph Fielding Smith [1976], 71.

"In this dispensation the keys that were committed to the father Adam will be restored, and we are to return into the favor and presence of the Lord. If we cease hostility, with the serpents and lay aside all enmity and treat all animals kindly, being humble and faithful with long suffering and forbearance no man need ever have a horse or a cow bitten by a snake. The serpents would soon become perfectly harmless, so that they could be handled without danger, children could play with them without receiving harm."

Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
The Journal of Brigham: Brigham Young's Own Story in His Own Words, comp. Lee Nelson, pg. 152.

"Let the people be holy, and the earth under their feet will be holy. Let the people be holy, and filled with the Spirit of God, and every animal and creeping thing will be filled with peace; the soil of the earth will bring forth in its strength, and the fruits thereof will be meat for man. The more purity that exists, the less is the strife; the more kind we are to our animals, the more will peace increase, and the savage nature of the brute creation vanish away. If the people will not serve the Devil another moment whilst they live, if this congregation is possessed of that spirit and resolution, here in this house is the Millennium. Let the inhabitants of this city be possessed of that spirit, let the people of the territory be possessed of that spirit, and here is the Millennium. Let the whole people . . . be possessed of that spirit and here is the Millennium, and so will it spread over all the world."

Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 1:203

Now behold, my son, I will explain this thing unto thee. For behold, after the Lord God sent our first parents forth from the garden of Eden, to till the ground, from whence they were taken—yea, he drew out the man, and he placed at the east end of the garden of Eden, cherubim, and a flaming sword which turned every way, to keep the tree of life—

Book of Mormon
Alma
Scriptures
Alma 42:2

And there were some who died with fevers, which at some seasons of the year were very frequent in the land—but not so much so with fevers, because of the excellent qualities of the many plants and roots which God had prepared to remove the cause of diseases, to which men were subject by the nature of the climate.

Book of Mormon
Alma
Scriptures
Alma 46:40

Go to and gather together thy flocks, both male and female, of every kind; and also of the seed of the earth of every kind; and thy families; and also Jared thy brother and his family; and also thy friends and their families, and the friends of Jared and their families.

Book of Mormon
Ether
Scriptures
Ether 1:41

Having all manner of fruit, and of grain, and of silks, and of fine linen, and of gold, and of silver, and of precious things;

Book of Mormon
Ether
Scriptures
Ether 9:17

When thou shalt besiege a city a long time, in making war against it to take it, thou shalt not destroy the trees thereof by forcing an axe against them: for thou mayest eat of them, and thou shalt not cut them down (for the tree of the field is man’s life) to employ them in the siege:

Old Testament
Deuteronomy
Scriptures
Deuteronomy 20:19

And he shall judge among the nations, and shall rebuke many people: and they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruninghooks: nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more.

Old Testament
Isaiah
Scriptures
Isaiah 2:4

Thou visitest the earth, and waterest it: thou greatly enrichest it with the river of God, which is full of water: thou preparest them corn, when thou hast so provided for it.

Old Testament
Psalms
Scriptures
Psalms 65:9

The pastures are clothed with flocks; the valleys also are covered over with corn; they shout for joy, they also sing.

Old Testament
Psalms
Scriptures
Psalms 65:13

“Good farmers, who take seriously their duties as stewards of Creation and of their land's inheritors, contribute to the welfare of society in more ways than society usually acknowledges, or even knows. These farmers produce valuable goods, of course; but they also conserve soil, they conserve water, they conserve wildlife, they conserve open space, they conserve scenery.”

Other Sources
Wendell Berry
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Bringing it to the Table: On Farming and Food

"He that plants trees loves others beside himself."

Other Sources
Thomas Fuller
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Gnomologia (1732) no. 2247

"What we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another."

Other Sources
Chris Maser
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Forest Primeval: The Natural History of an Ancient Forest, pg 230

"Institutions must have their art forms, their symbolic representations, and if the Heavenward aspirations of medieval Christianity found their expression in cathedrals and spires, the more mundane aspirations of the Latter-day Saints may just as readily be discovered in the widespread plantings of Mormon trees. They look Heavenward, but their roots are in the earth. The Mormon looked toward Heaven, but his Heaven was a Heaven on earth and he would inherit bliss in the flesh."

Other Sources
Wallace Stegner
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Mormon Country, 24.

"Trees are more precious than gold . . . I consider the life of a tree so sacred that I am reluctant to destroy it, even when the tree is no longer useful where it is, and even when it is in the way of a better improvement . . . I would like to see our children taught to respect tree life as they do bird life and animal life and human life. All are parts of the great creation of our Father . . . and none of the workmanship of His hands should we presume to tamper with, wreck or destroy, except as our needs may justify or our intelligence suggest as necessary for the welfare of those concerned."

Church Leaders
George Q. Cannon
General Authorities
Juvenile Instructor 34:266, May 1, 1899

"The designs of God, on the other hand, have been to promote the universal good of the universal world; to establish peace and good will among men; to promote the principles of eternal truth; to bring about a state of things that shall unite man to his fellow man; cause the world to 'beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks,' make the nations of the earth dwell in peace, and to bring about the millennial glory, when 'the earth shall yield its increase, resume its paradisean glory, and become as the garden of the Lord.'"

Church Leaders
Joseph Smith, Jr.
Presidents of the Church
"Editorial, 15 July 1842–A," p. 855, The Joseph Smith Papers.

"Let the people be holy, and the earth under their feet will be holy. Let the people be holy, and filled with the Spirit of God, and every animal and creeping thing will be filled with peace; the soil of the earth will bring forth in its strength, and the fruits thereof will be meat for man. The more purity that exists, the less is the strife; the more kind we are to our animals, the more will peace increase, and the savage nature of the brute creation vanish away. If the people will not serve the Devil another moment whilst they live, if this congregation is possessed of that spirit and resolution, here in this house is the Millennium. Let the inhabitants of this city be possessed of that spirit, let the people of the territory be possessed of that spirit, and here is the Millennium. Let the whole people . . . be possessed of that spirit and here is the Millennium, and so will it spread over all the world."

Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 1:203

Wherefore, if ye have sought to do wickedly in the days of your probation, then ye are found unclean before the judgment-seat of God; and no unclean thing can dwell with God; wherefore, ye must be cast off forever.

Book of Mormon
1 Nephi
Scriptures
1 Nephi 10:21

Nevertheless, if they pollute their inheritances they shall be thrown down; for I will not spare them if they pollute their inheritances.

Doctrine and Covenants
Doctrine and Covenants
Scriptures
D&C 103:14

Mortify therefore your members which are upon the earth; fornication, uncleanness, inordinate affection, evil concupiscence, and covetousness, which is idolatry: For which things' sake the wrath of God cometh on the children of disobedience.

New Testament
Colossians
Scriptures
Colossians 3:5-6

Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.

New Testament
Philippians
Scriptures
Philippians 4:8

So ye shall not pollute the land wherein ye are: for blood it defileth the land: and the land cannot be cleansed of the blood that is shed therein, but by the blood of him that shed it.

Old Testament
Numbers
Scriptures
Numbers 35:33

"And there are valuable lessons to be learned from the discovery and control of this potential health hazard. First, pollution may affect biological systems hundreds of miles from the source of the pollution itself. High mercury levels in fish in Lake Winnipeg may have resulted from practices followed by a single industrial plant in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, hundreds of miles up the Saskatchewan River."

Other Sources
A.B. Morrison
Church Magazines
"Our Deteriorating Environment" in Aug 1971 Ensign.

"I believe that pollution and environmental deterioration are primarily moral and spiritual problems, rather than problems of technology. Technology is mindless—a double-edged sword that will either produce or reduce pollution as man wills it. The prevalence of pollution stems from a lack of proper knowledge and understanding of the real purpose of life and of man’s place in the eternal plan provided by a loving Father in heaven."

Other Sources
A.B. Morrison
Church Magazines
"Our Deteriorating Environment" in Aug 1971 Ensign.

“Good farmers, who take seriously their duties as stewards of Creation and of their land's inheritors, contribute to the welfare of society in more ways than society usually acknowledges, or even knows. These farmers produce valuable goods, of course; but they also conserve soil, they conserve water, they conserve wildlife, they conserve open space, they conserve scenery.”

Other Sources
Wendell Berry
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Bringing it to the Table: On Farming and Food

"Our common home is like a sister with whom we share our life and a beautiful mother who opens her arms to embrace us . . . This sister now cries out to us because of the harm we have inflicted on her by our irresponsible use and abuse of the goods with which God has endowed her. We have come to see ourselves as her lords and masters, entitled to plunder her at will. The violence present in our hearts, wounded by sin, is also reflected in the symptoms of sickness evident in the soil, in the water, in the air and in all forms of life. This is why the earth herself, burdened and laid waste, is among the most abandoned and maltreated of our poor . . . "

Other Sources
Pope Francis
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Encyclical Letter Laudato Si': On Care for Our Common Home (24 May 2015)

"Environmentalism fits within a social justice movement as it focuses on the distribution of benefits and burdens of modern economic and industrial life. Burdens such as pollution and toxic wastes are not distributed randomly or equally but disproportionately affect low income communities."

Other Sources
Gary C. Bryner
Other Writings of Mormons
"Theology and Ecology: Religious Belief and Environmental Stewardship," in BYU Studies 49, no. 3 (2010)

"I have often thought that in our day and age—and I believe that there is some precedence in the scriptures for this, such as references to pollution in the last days and so on—one of the areas at which we could look seriously and about which we could feel good is this area of cleaning up our environment. I have a feeling that pollution is going to get worse and that there are going to be a lot of jobs in this area. I am convinced that the Lord is against pollution. He is against perversion. He is against prostitution—and prostitution has a much broader meaning than just its limited sexual sense; it really means perverting something from its correct use to an incorrect use. I would think that prostitution and pollution and perversion are all about the same, and God is against such things. How we treat him is reflected in how we treat others who are his children, and how we treat the elements and other forms of life on this earth, which are his. He created them. If there were one safe area in which to look for a livelihood, I think it would be in this area. I do not know whether this would be your avocation or not, but you might think about it. I am convinced in my own mind that we have not really fulfilled our mission in life as individuals or as a Church until we have demonstrated and shown as much advancement in other areas as we have in theology. We know how government ought to be, we know how society ought to be, we know what cleanliness ought to be, we know what the environment really should be; we should lead out in these areas. For instance, we recognize that we have environmental problems. I am not sure what the answer is, but I do not think the answer is what some “environmentalists” think it is—that is, to stop whatever we are doing—because we as a race must produce. I am not sure how to do it, but I am sure that there is a right way; we just need to discover it. I do not believe that the Lord is pleased with the constant corruption and pollution we so willingly endure—not just spiritually, but physically—to achieve some of our goals. I personally cannot help but believe that there is a better way. I cannot help but feel that God knows how to transform all of these base materials into useful tools without all the choking clouds of dust and the stench of pollution in our rivers and streams. He put our resources here, he put us here, and he knows what we need. He knows what is here and how to get things done. I do not think that he is against energy. I think that he is for all of these things, and wants us to use them in the proper way to get around, do his work, and build up his kingdom. But my faith is that there is a better way than we now know. He wants us to use the elements—to mold them for our use—but in a different way. Now should that not be something that you students here at BYU could figure out—with the Lord’s help? (And who should be closer to him than you?) We have talked about missions for individuals, and we are all aware of the Church mission. In my mind, BYU, as part of the Church, should become the pollution control center of the world—not only spiritually, but physically. I feel that this is important. We take the gospel to all the world in a spiritual way; we ought to do it in other ways, also . . . I guess we could say that, as far as our life’s mission is concerned, both spiritually and physically, we could feel good about doing away with pollution and putting purity in its place. That is a real challenge and is something that we should do. You at this University should be the leaders in doing it."

Church Leaders
John H. Groberg
General Authorities
"What is Your Mission?" Brigham Young University 1979 Speech

"Long ago, Eusebius, called the father of church history, tells of an early Christian tradition that the evil spirits which constantly seek to defile and corrupt human society 'move about in thick polluted air,' as a most fitting environment for their work. In a passage from a famous Hermetic work, the Koreø Kosmu (excerpt 23), the Air complains to the Creator, 'O Master, I myself am made thick and polluted, and by the stench of dead things from the dump I reek to heaven, so that I breed sickness, and have ceased to be wholesome; and when I look down from above I see things which are too awful to behold.'”

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Stewardship of the Air," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; this talk was given 16 February 1989 in Provo, Utah, as part of a Clear Air Symposium at Brigham Young University.

"The most famous passage relevant to our subject is from another medieval epic, the opening refrain from Macbeth: 'Fair is foul, and foul is fair: Hover through the fog and filthy air.' Shakespeare must have got the idea from the Bible, which calls Satan the Prince of the Air, but also the Prince of Darkness—that kind of air."

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Stewardship of the Air," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; this talk was given 16 February 1989 in Provo, Utah, as part of a Clear Air Symposium at Brigham Young University.

"All nature smiles, and teems with health and brightness and fragrance, where you are, but over the valley before you rests an awful, impenetrable, dark, black cloud, . . . approximating to a realization of your ideal of the 'dark valley of the shadow of death.' . . . You walk down the hillside, and, as you enter the thick, dark cloud, . . . you feel no more the invigorating influences [of the sun], . . . a sense of oppressiveness falls upon you, and you realize, to your unmistakable discomfort, that the darkness around [you] can not only be seen, but felt and tasted. Suddenly, to your great astonishment, you discover that this dreary spot is inhabited by human beings!"

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Stewardship of the Air," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; this talk was given 16 February 1989 in Provo, Utah, as part of a Clear Air Symposium at Brigham Young University.

"He contrasts the situation with that of the Latter-day Saints 'spreading themselves on the face of the earth, and carefully cultivating it,' invigorated by 'the pure, bracing air, [and with it] health.'”

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Stewardship of the Air," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; this talk was given 16 February 1989 in Provo, Utah, as part of a Clear Air Symposium at Brigham Young University.

"A far better gift than cash handouts to our nature-loving Boy Scouts, and school children, and to the freedom-loving citizens attending the festival in July, would be 'the clear blue sky [arching] over the values of the free,' the clearer the freer, including freedom from respiratory complications in later life. But of course there is one serious drawback to that. The clear blue skies cost much more than the highly publicized handouts."

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Stewardship of the Air," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; this talk was given 16 February 1989 in Provo, Utah, as part of a Clear Air Symposium at Brigham Young University.

"When He [Christ] interviews us, I feel certain that one of His questions will, in essence, be the following: 'What have you done with the earth which my Father and I gave you as a home? Have you cherished and protected it? Have you dressed it and kept it, as your father Adam was commanded to do? Or have you laid waste to it, defiled its waters, destroyed its fertile lands, befouled its life-giving air?' To those questions, I fear there are many, even among those who aspire to become a Zion people, who will hang their heads in shame. The earth groans under the insults inflicted upon it."

Church Leaders
Alexander B. Morrison
General Authorities
Visions of Zion, p. 77

"As the human soul is thus changed, the environment is better cared for. The doctrine and commandments of God lead us beyond the suffocating, self-limiting weight of selfishness, the blinding press of self-gratification or aggrandizement. The gospel of Jesus Christ helps us think beyond ourselves, to think of the earth and all life given by God and to think of others now and in future generations, rather than pursue the immediate vindication of our personal desires or avowed rights. If I pursue a selfish, irreverent course, I pursue a course that gives license to despoil the earth, for pollution, damage, and waste are almost always the product of selfishness or irreverence. To the degree that religion teaches reverence for God, for His creations, for life, and for our fellowman, it will teach us to care for the environment. In short, the state of the human soul and the environment are interconnected, each affects and influences the other."

Church Leaders
Marcus B. Nash
General Authorities
"Righteous Dominion and Compassion for the Earth." Speech at 18th Annual Stegner Center Symposium on 12 April, 2013.

"Many of you have seen the spiritual and temporal pollutions, scars, and damage wrought by man upon this earth and well may we all chime in with Enoch and ask ourselves: will we not have compassion upon the earth? Or are we too caught up in our personal pursuits and desires?"

Church Leaders
Marcus B. Nash
General Authorities
"Righteous Dominion and Compassion for the Earth." Speech at 18th Annual Stegner Center Symposium on 12 April, 2013.

"We hear much about cleaning up the physical environment—air, water, and other essentials that are being polluted in a way that is poisoning the physical environment for all of us. We may choose to join in such efforts. But we who are responsible to push back against the world should be at least equally concerned about forces that are poisoning the moral environment. I refer to such moral pollutions as pornography. I also refer to language that pollutes public communications with profanity, vulgarity, and morally degrading coarseness. Push back against these kinds of pollutions also. "In all of these efforts, we can trust in the great promises of the Lord. He has taught us, 'If ye are prepared ye shall not fear' (D&C 38:30). He has also taught us that He does not ask anything of us except He prepares the way for us to accomplish it (see 1 Nephi 3:7). He has shown us that while He may not immediately answer our prayers for relief, He will strengthen us to bear the burdens placed upon us (see Mosiah 24:14–15)."

Church Leaders
Dallin H. Oaks
General Authorities
"Push Back Against the World," BYU-Hawaii commencement, Feb 25, 2017.

"It is not likely that someone who does not love his neighbor will be concerned with his adverse impact on the environment . . . If there is disregard for oneself, there will be disregard for one's neighbor. If there is no reverence for life itself, there is apt to be little reverence for the resources God has given man. The outward expressions of irreverence for life and for fellowmen often take the form of heedless pollution of both air and water. But are these not expressions of the inner man? You are among those who must undertake the task of alerting mankind to problems with regard to his physical environment, but do you not see that if you attempt to do this without giving heed to the spiritual law involved, you undertake an impossible task."

Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
The Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson (Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1988), 643

"[W]e are morally obligated to turn this land over to those who succeed us—not drained of its fertility, but improved in quality, in productivity, and in usefulness for future generations. I am sure our Heavenly Father expects us to use these precious natural resources wisely, unselfishly, and effectively—both our soil and our water"

Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
The Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson (Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, Inc. 1988), 645.

“Stewardship in the Church is a very important matter. The Lord has mentioned it in the revelations. (See D&C 59; 104.) We are stewards over these earthly blessings which the Lord has provided, those of us who have this soil and this water. We have no moral latitude, it seems to me. In fact, we are morally obligated to turn this land over to those who succeed us—not drained of its fertility but improved in quality, in productivity, and in usefulness for future generations.”

Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
The Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson, 645.

“Surely you can see the inconsistency in the individual who insists that we be good stewards and not pollute our environment, and yet who is unscrupulous in his personal life. Again, physical and spiritual laws are interrelated. Pollution of one's environment and moral impurity both rest on a life-style which partakes of a philosophy of ‘eat, drink, and be merry’—gouge and grab now, without regard to the consequences. Both violate the spirit of stewardship for which we will stand accountable.”

Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
The Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson [1988], 644.

"Irreverence for God, of life, and for our fellowmen takes the form of things like littering, heedless strip-mining, pollution of water and air.  But these are, after all, outward expressions of the inner man."

Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
“Problems Affecting the Domestic Tranquility of Citizens of the United States of America,” Vital Speeches 42 (February 1 1976): 240.

"The Church has urged its members to be efficient users of our resources and to avoid waste and pollution, and to clean up their own immediate environment, or that over which they have control . . . We have made an appeal to all Church members to clean up their premises, to plant gardens and trees, and then to use efficiently what they can grow. We have found that Church members have responded well to this appeal, thus becoming more self-reliant and responsibly concerned for their neighbors and their environment."

Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
This Nation Shall Endure, p. 79 (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1977), 79.

"You are here commencing anew. The soil, the air, the water are all pure and healthy. Do not suffer them to become polluted with wickedness. Strive to preserve the elements from being contaminated by the filthy, wicked conduct and sayings of those who pervert the intelligence God has bestowed upon the human family."

Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 8:79

"Here are the elements. They are not made in vain, but are made for the benefit, comfort, convenience and happiness of God’s children."

Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses, 8:340, January 20, 1861.

And I did teach my people to build buildings, and to work in all manner of wood, and of iron, and of copper, and of brass, and of steel, and of gold, and of silver, and of precious ores, which were in great abundance.

Book of Mormon
2 Nephi
Scriptures
2 Nephi 5:15

"Here are a few ideas you might consider in trying to take better care of the earth: Find ways to reduce unnecessary personal consumption of energy, water, wood products, and other products that come from scarce resources. Stop using products that damage the environment. Recycle metal, glass, plastic, and paper products. Be conscientious in disposing of chemical wastes properly. Learn more about natural processes and earth science. Cultivate a garden where possible; learn the art and science of composting. Adopt a conservation rather than a consumption attitude. Be grateful."

Other Sources
G. Michael Alder
Church Magazines
"Earth—A Gift of Gladness" in July 1991 Ensign.

"But if the work has already been done, all the physical arrangements completed, and the vessel a model of perfection at the time we set foot on the deck, what remains for us to do on it and with it? That is for us to find out first of all, according to Brigham, examining the structure with care, studying its nature and possibilities meticulously, considering well before we lay about us with gun, fire, and plow."

Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Brigham Young on the Environment," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; printed in Truman Madsen and Charles D. Tate, eds., To the Glory of God: Mormon Essays on Great Issues—Environment, Commitment, Love, Peace, Youth, Man (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1972), 3—29.

"True disciples [of Christ] . . . would be consistent environmentalists—caring both about maintaining the spiritual health of a marriage and preserving a rain forest; caring about preserving the nutrient capacity of a family as well as providing a healthy supply of air and water . . . Adam and Eve were to 'dress the garden,' not exploit it. Like them, we are to keep the commandments, so that we can enjoy all the resources God has given us, resources described as 'enough and to spare' (D&C 104:17), if we use and husband them wisely."

Church Leaders
Neal A. Maxwell
General Authorities
A Wonderful Flood of Light (Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1990), 103.

“The instructions to Adam and Eve about the garden earth . . . have not been rescinded. They were, and we are, to dress it—not destroy it. They were to take good care of it instead of abusing it. Our increasing interdependence on this planet makes some forms of individual selfishness the equivalent of a runaway personal bulldozer. If we have no concern for the generations to follow, the means are at hand to tear up the terrain much more than was ever possible anciently.”

Church Leaders
Neal A. Maxwell
General Authorities
That Ye May Believe (Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1992), 75.

"We as a church believe and so declare that in the end the earth will be renewed and receive its paradisiacal glory. When this is done it will be beautiful and glorious beyond finite conception. This being our doctrine, do you think it becoming in God's children to deface the earth while we sojourn here? Being the stewards and custodians of the resources which are committed to us, have we not an obligation to use them, preserve them and return them in the best possible condition of which our circumstances will permit? I think upon reflection you will say that we have such an obligation and that it is very definitely our task to make God's footstool as beautiful as we may. For 'the earth is the Lord's and the fullness thereof,' and the righteous 'and their generations shall inherit the earth from generation to generation forever and forever.' What a delightful abode for men this good earth could be if men would but make it so!"

Church Leaders
Stephen L. Richards
General Authorities
April 1940 General Conference

"The Church has urged its members to be efficient users of our resources and to avoid waste and pollution, and to clean up their own immediate environment, or that over which they have control . . . We have made an appeal to all Church members to clean up their premises, to plant gardens and trees, and then to use efficiently what they can grow. We have found that Church members have responded well to this appeal, thus becoming more self-reliant and responsibly concerned for their neighbors and their environment."

Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
This Nation Shall Endure, p. 79 (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1977), 79.