Nature's Beauty Brings Joy and Healing

1. My country, 'tis of thee, Sweet land of liberty, Of thee I sing; Land where my fathers died, Land of the pilgrims' pride, From ev'ry mountainside Let freedom ring! 2. My native country, thee, Land of the noble free, Thy name I love; I love thy rocks and rills, Thy woods and templed hills. My heart with rapture thrills Like that above. 3. Let music swell the breeze And ring from all the trees Sweet freedom's song; Let mortal tongues awake; Let all that breathe partake; Let rocks their silence break, The sound prolong. 4. Our fathers' God, to thee, Author of liberty, To thee we sing; Long may our land be bright With freedom's holy light. Protect us by thy might, Great God, our King!
Other Sources
Samuel F. Smith
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
"My Country, 'Tis of Thee," LDS Hymnal, #339
“Who gave the lower animals a love for those sweet sounds, which with magic power fill the air with harmony, and cheer and comfort the hearts of men, and so wonderfully affect the brute creation? It was the Lord, our heavenly Father, who gave the capacity to enjoy these sounds, and which we ought to do in His name, and to His glory.”
Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 1:48
“It is the privilege of the Saints to enjoy every good thing, for the earth and its fulness belong to the Lord, and he has promised all to his faithful Saints; but it must be enjoyed without spirit of covetousness and selfishness—without the spirit of lust, and in the spirit of the Gospel; then the sun will shine sweetly upon us; each day will be filled with delight, and all things will be filled with beauty, giving joy, pleasure, and rest to the Saints.”
Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 8:82
“It is one of the most happifying subjects that can be named, for a person, or people, to have the privilege of gaining wisdom enough while in their mortal tabernacle . . . and understand the design of the Great Maker of this beautiful creation.”
Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 1:111.
“Every flower, shrub, and tree to beautify, and to gratify the taste and smell, and every sensation that gives to man joy and felicity are for the Saints who receive them from the Most High.”
Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 9:244
"When the Spirit of revelation from God inspires a man, his mind is opened to behold the beauty, order, and glory of the creation of this earth and its inhabitants, the object of its creation, and the purpose of its Creator in peopling it with his children."
Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 9:256
"All the creations are His work, and they are for His glory and for the benefit of the children of men; and all things are put into the possession of man for his comfort, improvement and consolation, and for his health, wealth, beauty and excellency."
Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 13:151
"But as an intelligent being, if I have a mind capable of reflection, I wish to contemplate the works of nature, and to know something of nature's God, and my destiny. I love to view the things around me; to gaze upon the sun, moon, and stars; to study the planetary system, and the world we inhabit; to behold their beauty, order, harmony, and the operations of existence around me. I can see something more than that mean jargon, those childish quibbles, this heaven beyond the bounds of time and space, where they have nothing to do but sit and sing themselves away to everlasting bliss, or go and roast on gridirons. There is nothing like that to be found in nature—everything is beautifully harmonious, and perfectly adapted to the position it occupies in the world. Whether you look at birds, beasts, or the human system, you see something exquisitely beautiful and harmonious, and worthy of the contemplation of all intelligence. What is man's wisdom in comparison to it? I could not help but believe there was a God, if there was no such thing as religion in the world."
Church Leaders
John Taylor
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 1:151-2, June 12, 1853
"The blessings of providence were made for man, and his enjoyment; he is placed as head of creation. For him the earth teems with the richest profusion; the golden grain, the luscious fruit, the choicest vines; for him, the herbs, and flowers bedeck the earth, shed their odoriferous perfumes, and display their gorgeous beauty; . . . For him, the shrub and vine bloom and blossom, and nature clothes herself in her richest attire; the rippling stream, the pure fountain, the crystal river flow for him, all nature spreads her richest charms, and invites him to partake of her joyousness, beauty, and innocence, and to worship her God."
Church Leaders
John Taylor
Presidents of the Church
Teachings of Presidents of the Church: John Taylor, (2011), 97–105
"We have eyes and see not, for that which we cannot appreciate or admire we are largely blind to, no matter how beautiful or inspiring it may be. As children of God, it is our duty to appreciate and worship Him in His creations. If we would associate all that is truly good and beautiful in life with thoughts of Him, we would be able to trace His handiwork throughout all nature."
Church Leaders
Joseph F. Smith
Presidents of the Church
Juvenile Instructor, 39:627-28, October 15, 1904.
"When a man has found God and understands his ways, he learns that nothing in the universe came by chance, but all things resulted from a divinely prearranged plan. What a rich meaning comes into his life! Understanding which surpasses worldly learning is his. The beauties of the world become more beautiful, the order of the universe becomes more meaningful, and all of God’s creations are more understandable as he witnesses God’s days come and go and the seasons follow each in their order."
Church Leaders
Howard W. Hunter
Presidents of the Church
Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Howard W. Hunter
"What a glorious thing is life, surrounded by the beauties of the world in which we live. There is beauty in the mountains, the woods, and the lakes. There is beauty in the sea with its never-ceasing tides; beauty in the skies filled with fleecy clouds, in the sunshine and in the rain; beauty in the morning, the day, and the night. As the seasons come and go, we find beauty in the freshness of spring bringing new life to all nature, and beauty in the glory of the summer. Autumn ushers in an array of color before the silent winter brings its blanket of white. There is beauty everywhere if we look for the beautiful."
Church Leaders
Howard W. Hunter
Presidents of the Church
Conference Report, April 1970, pg. 7.
"My mother had taught me to pray and to thank Heavenly Father for all the things that I enjoyed. I often thanked Him for the beauty of the earth and for the wonderful times that I had at the ranch and by the river and with the Scouts."
Church Leaders
Howard W. Hunter
Presidents of the Church
"Sharing Time: I Believe in Being Obedient" - Friend May 1995
“I believe in beauty. The earth in its pristine beauty is an expression of the nature of its Creator. . . . I believe in the beauty of nature—the flowers, the fruit, the sky, the peaks and the plains from which they rise. I see and believe in the beauty of animals. . . . I believe in beauty—the beauty of God's unspoiled creations, the beauty of his sons and daughters who walk without whimpering, meeting the challenges of each new day.”
Church Leaders
Gordon B. Hinckley
Presidents of the Church
The Teachings of Gordon B. Hinckley, 248, 249.
"Cultivate an attitude of happiness. Cultivate a spirit of optimism. Walk with faith, rejoicing in the beauties of nature, in the goodness of those you love, in the testimony which you carry in your heart concerning things divine."
Church Leaders
Gordon B. Hinckley
Presidents of the Church
Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Gordon B. Hinckley, 2016
"Some of the happiest people I know have none of [the] things the world insists are necessary for satisfaction and joy. Why are they happy? . . . They glory in the beauty of the earth. They glory in the rivers and the canyons and the call of the meadowlark. They glory in the love of their families, the stumbling steps of a toddler, the wise and tender smile of the elderly."
Church Leaders
Joseph B. Wirthlin
General Authorities
"Lessons Learned in the Journey of Life," Ensign Dec. 2000
"Do you take time to discover each day how beautiful your life can be? How long has it been since you watched the sun set? The departing rays kissing the clouds, trees, hills, and lowlands good night, sometimes tranquilly, sometimes with exuberant bursts of color and form. What of the wonder of a cloudless night when the Lord unveils the marvels of His heavens—the twinkling stars, the moonlight rays—to ignite our imagination with His greatness and glory? How captivating to watch a seed planted in fertile soil germinate, gather strength, and send forth a tiny, seemingly insignificant sprout. Patiently it begins to grow and develop its own character led by the genetic code the Lord has provided to guide its development. With care it surely will become what it is destined to be: a lily, crowned with grace and beauty; a fragrant spearmint plant; a peach; an avocado; or a beautiful blossom with unique delicacy, hue, and fragrance. When last did you observe a tiny rosebud form? Each day it develops new and impressive character, more promise of beauty until it becomes a majestic rose. You are one of the noblest of God’s creations. His intent is that your life be gloriously beautiful regardless of your circumstances. As you are grateful and obedient, you can become all that God intends you to be."
Church Leaders
Richard G. Scott
General Authorities
"Finding Joy in Life," Ensign, May 1996, 24.
"I am sure that beauty is intimately associated with pure religion. I believe that our Father in Heaven is a God of order and beauty. I doubt if any rational being ever entertained a concept of God, that is, as a personal Being, except in surroundings of beauty and exquisite loveliness."
Church Leaders
Stephen L. Richards
General Authorities
“I am a lover of the nature and the great outdoors. . . . The regard that I have for these places has grown with the years until they have become dear and sacred. I must tell you what they mean to me. . . I feel reconciled with life. The broken harmonies are mended. My soul is calmed.”
Church Leaders
Stephen L. Richards
General Authorities
Conference Report, 7 Apr. 1940
"The pilgrim is at home in the leafy valley. He may pursue his quest without hindrance or disturbance, except perhaps for the commotion of his thoughts and his feelings as he ponders this marvel of God's handiwork."
Church Leaders
Stephen L. Richards
General Authorities
April 1940 General Conference
"I want to present another aspect of equal if not superior importance. Some of you may remember an old play which was popular on the boards many years ago. It was called 'Ingomar, the Barbarian.' There was a scene in this play between the barbarian and Parthenia, the fair maiden whom he had come to love. The girl is picking flowers and Ingomar, wondering at her interest in them, asks her, 'What is their use?' Rather startled at such a question, the maiden answers, 'Why, they're beautiful ! That's their use.'"
Church Leaders
Stephen L. Richards
General Authorities
April 1940 General Conference
"I thought there would be exclamations of delight and wonder [at seeing Bryce Canyon]. There were not. They just looked and as they looked, tears flowed down their cheeks like drops of rain. I'm not ashamed to say my eyes filled too. There were no words, only feeling—feeling too deep for expression."
Church Leaders
Stephen L. Richards
General Authorities
April 1940 General Conference
"I am passionately fond of Bryce [Canyon]. She is a cameo of nature — not big, but big enough to have dignity. One looks down on her, but it is literally and not figuratively, for she commands esteem as well as love. I have seen her at sunrise, at sunset, and in the moonlight; and as the light and shadows play on her jeweled spires, her cathedrals, her organ, her dainty nymphs and graces, the ethereal world seems very near, the imagination runs riot with the senses, and the soul of man is transported into a realm of exquisite beauty and loveliness."
Church Leaders
Stephen L. Richards
General Authorities
April 1940 General Conference
"Any house, great or small, attains its real attraction and beauty in a setting which nature, with a little human effort, provides. What a pity it is not to take advantage of this kindly provision of nature when it costs so little and means so much."
Church Leaders
Stephen L. Richards
General Authorities
April 1940 General Conference
"Not only did God create a beautiful world of mountains, valleys, rivers, streams, seas, sunsets and sunrises, but He also adorned it with plant and animal life. According to LDS scripture, each form of plant and animal life has a spirit."
Church Leaders
Marcus B. Nash
General Authorities
"Righteous Dominion and Compassion for the Earth." Speech at 18th Annual Stegner Center Symposium on 12 April, 2013.
"Do you remember the first time you knew there was a God and could feel His love? As a boy, I used to gaze into the starry sky and ponder and feel His presence. I thrilled to explore the magnificent beauties of God’s creations—from tiny insects to towering trees. As I recognized the beauty of this earth, I knew that Heavenly Father loved me. I knew that I was a literal spiritual offspring, that we are all sons and daughters of God."
Church Leaders
Robert D. Hales
General Authorities
"Eternal Life—to Know Our Heavenly Father and His Son, Jesus Christ," Oct. 2014
"The miracle of the changing seasons, with the reawakening and rebirth in nature, inspires feelings of love and reverence within us for God’s marvelous, creative handiwork."
Church Leaders
M. Russell Ballard
General Authorities
"God's Love for His Children," 1988.
"All the marvels of nature are glimpses of his divine power and expressions of his love."
Church Leaders
M. Russell Ballard
General Authorities
"God's Love for His Children," 1988.
And out of the ground made I, the Lord God, to grow every tree, naturally, that is pleasant to the sight of man; and man could behold it. And it became also a living soul.
Pearl of Great Price
9 3
Moses
Moses 3:9
1. Our mountain home so dear, Where crystal waters clear Flow ever free, Flow ever free, While thru the valleys wide The flow'rs on ev'ry side, Blooming in stately pride, Are fair to see. 2. We'll roam the verdant hills And by the sparkling rills Pluck the wildflow'rs, Pluck the wildflow'rs; The fragrance on the air, The landscape bright and fair, And sunshine ev'rywhere Make pleasant hours. 3. In sylvan depth and shade, In forest and in glade, Where-e'er we pass, Where-e'er we pass, The hand of God we see In leaf and bud and tree, Or bird or humming bee, Or blade of grass. 4. The streamlet, flow'r, and sod Bespeak the works of God; And all combine, And all combine, With most transporting grace, His handiwork to trace, Thru nature's smiling face, In art divine.
Other Sources
Emmeline B. Wells
Other Writings of Mormons
"Our Mountain Home So Dear," LDS Hymnal, #33
1. O ye mountains high, where the clear blue sky Arches over the vales of the free, Where the pure breezes blow and the clear streamlets flow, How I've longed to your bosom to flee! O Zion! dear Zion! land of the free, Now my own mountain home, unto thee I have come; All my fond hopes are centered in thee.
Other Sources
Charles W. Penrose
Other Writings of Mormons
"O Ye Mountains High," LDS Hymnal, #34
"It behooves us as fortunate visitors in the King’s palace to behave circumspectly, to look and admire, damage nothing, take nothing with us, and leave everything as nearly as possible as we found it. Restraint is the watchword in dealing with God’s earth: The products of the earth are 'to please the eye [that always comes first!] and to gladden the heart; yea, for food and for raiment, for taste and for smell . . . to be used with judgment, not to excess, neither by extortion' (D&C 59:18—20). We may neither waste nor exploit what we find around us; Mirriam-Webster defines extortion as the obtaining 'from an unwilling or reluctant person by physical force, intimidation, or the abuse of legal or official authority.' We have a right to take what we need, but when we would extend that right to justify taking things we do not need, that is extortion, and is expressly forbidden."
Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Brigham Young on the Environment," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; printed in Truman Madsen and Charles D. Tate, eds., To the Glory of God: Mormon Essays on Great Issues—Environment, Commitment, Love, Peace, Youth, Man (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1972), 3-29.
"Trees were made in the first instance to be looked at and enjoyed; we are aware of that before research and experience show our intuition to be quite sound—but the feeling for beauty must come first if we are to survive."
Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Brigham Young on the Environment," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; printed in Truman Madsen and Charles D. Tate, eds., To the Glory of God: Mormon Essays on Great Issues—Environment, Commitment, Love, Peace, Youth, Man (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1972), 3-29.
"The earth. . . is enormously productive and contains unlimited supply for all who come to live on it, as long as they use its bounty 'with judgment, not to excess, neither by extortion,' the Lord has said (D&C 59:20), that is, properly distributed, without waste or inequality. It contains 'all things... made for the benefit and the use of man, both to please the eye and to gladden the heart; yea, for food and for raiment, for taste and for smell, to strengthen the body and to enliven the soul' (D&C 59:18-19). Notice here that the eye and the heart have priority over the stomach, that taste and smell have claims equal to appetite, that the enlivening of the soul is as important as the strengthening of the body."
Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
Approaching Zion, p. 8
2. In the cottage there is joy When there's love at home; Hate and envy ne'er annoy When there's love at home. Roses bloom beneath our feet; All the earth's a garden sweet, Making life a bliss complete When there's love at home. Love at home, love at home; Making life a bliss complete When there's love at home. 3. Kindly heaven smiles above When there's love at home; All the world is filled with love When there's love at home. Sweeter sings the brooklet by; Brighter beams the azure sky. Oh, there's One who smiles on high When there's love at home. Love at home, love at home; Oh, there's One who smiles on high When there's love at home.
Other Sources
John Hugh McNaughton
Other Writings of Mormons
"Love at Home," LDS Hymnal, #318
"God expects us to make use of nature, but the priority is on nature’s intrinsic beauty which bears witness of Christ’s love and for which we have an ethical responsibility to demonstrate due appreciation."
Other Sources
George Handley
Other Writings of Mormons
"LDS Belief and the Environment" on Save Our Canyons website
"LDS scriptures clearly announce the centrality of human beings as God’s offspring and declare that all of creation was provided for human enjoyment and use. Significantly, however, this human-centered view does not justify abuse of nature; enjoyment and appreciation come before use."
Other Sources
George Handley
Other Writings of Mormons
"LDS Belief and the Environment" on Save Our Canyons website
"There is something that inspires us when we view a great work of art. Fortunately this experience is available to even those who are distant from an art museum or treasured private collection—we need only look at a flower, a sunset, or the stars above our head to realize that we live within an artistic masterpiece."
Other Sources
Paul Cox
Other Writings of Mormons
“Paley's Stone, Creationism, and Conservation,” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 33–42.
"These principles have been well developed in the literature and are only summarized briefly here. First, the earth and all creation belong to God; they witness, bear record of, and reflect his power and love for humankind. The earth’s resources are to be used not just to meet human needs but also to elevate the human spirit. All forms of life have intrinsic value. All are creations of God. All living things have a spiritual as well as an earthly dimension, and all were created spiritually before being placed on the earth physically (see Moses 3:5; D&C 59:18). Second, our use of resources should be guided by principles of equity, conservation, and minimal waste; consumption that meets our needs; and restraint that encourages spiritual values (D&C 49:19–20; 70:14; 104:14–17). Third, materialism and overconsumption are threats to environmental and spiritual well-being. The biblical injunction of Luke 12:15, 'Take heed, and beware of covetousness: for a man’s life consisteth not in the abundance of the things which he possesseth,' is repeated in Mormon scriptures where members are urged to seek first the kingdom of God and to trust not in the things of the world (see Jacob 2:18–19; D&C 121:35). Fourth, humans have a sacred stewardship to protect and preserve creation for themselves and for succeeding generations (D&C 104:11–17)."
Other Sources
Gary C. Bryner
Other Writings of Mormons
"Theology and Ecology: Religious Belief and Environmental Stewardship," in BYU Studies 49, no. 3 (2010)
"The reminder and the reassurance that [wilderness] is still there is good for our spiritual health even if we never once in ten years set foot in it. It is good for us when we are young, because of the incomparable sanity it can bring briefly, as vacation and rest, into our insane lives. It is important to us when we are old simply because it is there—important, that is, simply as an idea."
Other Sources
Wallace Stegner
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
"Wilderness Idea," in The Sound of Mountain Water (1969)
1. "For the beauty of the earth, For the beauty of the skies, For the love which from our birth Over and around us lies," (Chorus) "Lord of all, to thee we raise This our hymn of grateful praise." 2. "For the beauty of each hour Of the day and of the night, Hill and vale, and tree and flow'r, Sun and moon, and stars of light," 3. "For the joy of human love, Brother, sister, parent, child, Friends on earth, and friends above, For all gentle thoughts and mild,"
Other Sources
Folliot S. Pierpoint
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
"For the Beauty of the Earth," LDS Hymn #92
"These blessed mountains are so compactly filled with God's beauty, no petty personal hope or experience has room to be . . . Perched like a fly on this Yosemite dome, I gaze and sketch and bask, oftentimes settling down into dumb admiration without definite hope of ever learning much, yet with the longing, unresting effort that lies at the door of hope, humbly prostrate before the vast display of God's power, and eager to offer self-denial and renunciation with eternal toil to learn any lesson in the divine manuscript."
Other Sources
John Muir
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
"My First Summer in the Sierra"
"Mountains seem to answer an increasing imaginative need in the West. More and more people are discovering a desire for them, and a powerful solace in them. At bottom, mountains, like all wildernesses, challenge our complacent conviction - so easy to lapse into - that the world has been made for humans by humans. Most of us exist for most of the time in worlds which are humanly arranged, themed and controlled. One forgets that there are environments which do not respond to the flick of a switch or the twist of a dial, and which have their own rhythms and orders of existence. Mountains correct this amnesia. By speaking of greater forces than we can possibly invoke, and by confronting us with greater spans of time than we can possibly envisage, mountains refute our excessive trust in the man-made. They pose profound questions about our durability and the importance of our schemes. They induce, I suppose, a modesty in us."
Other Sources
Robert Macfarlane
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Mountains of the Mind: Adventures in Reaching the Summit
1. Oh Lord my God When I in awesome wonder Consider all the worlds Thy hands have made I see the stars I hear the rolling thunder Thy power throughout The universe displayed Then sings my soul My Savior, God, To Thee, How Great Thou Art
Other Sources
Stuart K. Hine
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
"How Great Thou Art," LDS Hymnal, #86
"From my perspective, I absolutely believe in a greater spiritual power, far greater than I am, from which I have derived strength in moments of sadness or fear. That's what I believe, and it was very, very strong in the forest."
Other Sources
Jane Goodall
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Interview with Steven D. Greydanus.
“The best remedy for those who are afraid, lonely or unhappy is to go outside, somewhere where they can be quite alone with the heavens, nature and God. Because only then does one feel that all is as it should be and that God wishes to see people happy, amidst the simple beauty of nature. As longs as this exists, and it certainly always will, I know that then there will always be comfort for every sorrow, whatever the circumstances may be. And I firmly believe that nature brings solace in all troubles."
Other Sources
Anne Frank
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
The Diary of a Young Girl
"The quietness of the scene brought to my mind a sense of loneliness almost painful. The beauties of nature had a charm, the voice of God came to me through every motionless leaf, every blade of grass, and every breath of air I drew."
Other Sources
Jasper Cropsey
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Letter from Jasper F. Cropsey to Maria, July 4, 1846. NCF Transcripts.
“It is a wholesome and necessary thing for us to turn again to the earth and in the contemplation of her beauties to know the sense of wonder and humility.”
Other Sources
Rachel Carson
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
The Sense of Wonder
“Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will ensure as long as life lasts. There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature - the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after winter."
Other Sources
Rachel Carson
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Silent Spring
"I go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put in order."
Other Sources
John Burroughs
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Time and Change (1912)
"When despair for the world grows in me and I wake in the night at the least sound in fear of what my life and my children's lives may be, I go and lie down where the wood drake rests in his beauty on the water, and the great heron feeds. I come into the peace of wild things who do not tax their lives with forethought of grief. I come into the presence of still water. And I feel above me the day-blind stars waiting with their light. For a time I rest in the grace of the world, and am free."
Other Sources
Wendell Berry
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
The Selected Poems of Wendell Berry
1. Oh, beautiful for spacious skies, For amber waves of grain, For purple mountain majesties Above the fruited plain! America! America! God shed his grace on thee, And crown thy good with brotherhood From sea to shining sea. 2. Oh, beautiful for pilgrim feet, Whose stern, impassioned stress A thoroughfare of freedom beat Across the wilderness! America! America! God mend thine ev'ry flaw, Confirm thy soul in self-control, Thy liberty in law. 3. Oh, beautiful for heroes proved In liberating strife, Who more than self their country loved, And mercy more than life! America! America! May God thy gold refine, Till all success be nobleness, And ev'ry gain divine. 4. Oh, beautiful for patriot dream That sees beyond the years Thine alabaster cities gleam, Undimmed by human tears! America! America! God shed his grace on thee, And crown thy good with brotherhood From sea to shining sea.
Other Sources
Katherine Lee Bates
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
"America the Beautiful," LDS Hymnal, #338
Where wast thou when I laid the foundations of the earth? . . . When the morning stars sang together, and all the sons of God shouted for joy?
Old Testament
4,7 38
Job
Job 38:4,7
He hath made every thing beautiful in his time; also he hath set the world in their heart, so that no man can find out the work that God maketh from the beginning to the end.
Old Testament
11 3
Ecclesiastes
Ecclesiastes 3:11
When Jesus heard of [the death of John the baptist], he departed thence by ship into a desert place apart: and when the people had heard thereof, they followed him on foot out of the cities.
New Testament
13 14
Matthew
Matthew 14:13
When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy.
New Testament
10 2
Matthew
Matthew 2:10
Yea, all things which come of the earth, in the season thereof, are made for the benefit and the use of man, both to please the eye and to gladden the heart; Yea, for food and for raiment, for taste and for smell, to strengthen the body and to enliven the soul.
Doctrine and Covenants
18-19 59
D&C
D&C 59:18-19
And they came to a land, yea, even a very beautiful and pleasant land, a land of pure water.
Book of Mormon
4 23
Mosiah
Mosiah 23:4
And now it came to pass that all this was done in Mormon, yea, by the waters of Mormon, in the forest that was near the waters of Mormon; yea, the place of Mormon, the waters of Mormon, the forest of Mormon, how beautiful are they to the eyes of them who there came to the knowledge of their Redeemer; yea, and how blessed are they, for they shall sing to his praise forever.
Book of Mormon
30 18
Mosiah
Mosiah 18:30