Purity of Water, Air, and Land

"Here are the elements. They are not made in vain, but are made for the benefit, comfort, convenience and happiness of God’s children."
Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses, 8:340, January 20, 1861.
“Not many generations will pass away before the days of man will again return. But it will take generations to entirely eradicate the influences of deleterious substances. This must be done before we can attain our paradisiacal state.”
Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 8:64
"You are here commencing anew. The soil, the air, the water are all pure and healthy. Do not suffer them to become polluted with wickedness. Strive to preserve the elements from being contaminated by the filthy, wicked conduct and sayings of those who pervert the intelligence God has bestowed upon the human family."
Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 8:79
"What constitutes health, wealth, joy, and peace? In the first place, good pure air is the greatest sustainer of animal life."
Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 8:168
"Keep your valley pure, keep your towns as pure as you possibly can, keep your hearts pure, and labour what you can consistently, but not so as to injure yourselves. Be faithful in your religion. Be full of love and kindness towards each other."
Church Leaders
Brigham Young
Presidents of the Church
Journal of Discourses 8:80
[Thomas G. Alexander writes:] "President Smith was alarmed over the damage to mountain watersheds by unrestricted logging and grazing. In a special general priesthood meeting held on April 7, 1902, he put before the body of the priesthood a vote to withdraw all public lands above Utah towns in or to protect them from damage."
Church Leaders
Joseph F. Smith
Presidents of the Church
“Stewardship and Enterprise: The LDS Church and the Wasatch Oasis Environment, 1847–1930,” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 15–32.
“I believe in beauty. The earth in its pristine beauty is an expression of the nature of its Creator . . . I believe in the beauty of nature—the flowers, the fruit, the sky, the peaks and the plains from which they rise. I see and believe in the beauty of animals . . . I believe in beauty—the beauty of God's unspoiled creations, the beauty of his sons and daughters who walk without whimpering, meeting the challenges of each new day.”
Church Leaders
Gordon B. Hinckley
Presidents of the Church
The Teachings of Gordon B. Hinckley, 248, 249.
"The Church has urged its members to be efficient users of our resources and to avoid waste and pollution, and to clean up their own immediate environment, or that over which they have control . . . We have made an appeal to all Church members to clean up their premises, to plant gardens and trees, and then to use efficiently what they can grow. We have found that Church members have responded well to this appeal, thus becoming more self-reliant and responsibly concerned for their neighbors and their environment."
Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
This Nation Shall Endure, p. 79 (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1977), 79.
"Irreverence for God, of life, and for our fellowmen takes the form of things like littering, heedless strip-mining, pollution of water and air.  But these are, after all, outward expressions of the inner man."
Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
“Problems Affecting the Domestic Tranquility of Citizens of the United States of America,” Vital Speeches 42 (February 1 1976): 240.
“Surely you can see the inconsistency in the individual who insists that we be good stewards and not pollute our environment, and yet who is unscrupulous in his personal life. Again, physical and spiritual laws are interrelated. Pollution of one's environment and moral impurity both rest on a life-style which partakes of a philosophy of ‘eat, drink, and be merry’—gouge and grab now, without regard to the consequences. Both violate the spirit of stewardship for which we will stand accountable.”
Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
The Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson [1988], 644.
“Stewardship in the Church is a very important matter. The Lord has mentioned it in the revelations. (See D&C 59; 104.) We are stewards over these earthly blessings which the Lord has provided, those of us who have this soil and this water. We have no moral latitude, it seems to me. In fact, we are morally obligated to turn this land over to those who succeed us—not drained of its fertility but improved in quality, in productivity, and in usefulness for future generations.”
Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
The Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson, 645.
"[W]e are morally obligated to turn this land over to those who succeed us—not drained of its fertility, but improved in quality, in productivity, and in usefulness for future generations. I am sure our Heavenly Father expects us to use these precious natural resources wisely, unselfishly, and effectively—both our soil and our water"
Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
The Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson (Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, Inc. 1988), 645.
"It is terribly important that we preserve and improve the great natural resources with which the God of heaven has so richly blessed us, that we may not follow the experience of some other nations that have come and gone because of the mismanagement of their natural and God-given resources."
Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
The Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson, 645.
"It is not likely that someone who does not love his neighbor will be concerned with his adverse impact on the environment . . . If there is disregard for oneself, there will be disregard for one's neighbor. If there is no reverence for life itself, there is apt to be little reverence for the resources God has given man. The outward expressions of irreverence for life and for fellowmen often take the form of heedless pollution of both air and water. But are these not expressions of the inner man? You are among those who must undertake the task of alerting mankind to problems with regard to his physical environment, but do you not see that if you attempt to do this without giving heed to the spiritual law involved, you undertake an impossible task."
Church Leaders
Ezra Taft Benson
Presidents of the Church
The Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson (Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1988), 643
"Sinning against the land is as much a sin as many of those we talk most about. I have been tempted for some time to make a similar theme my own at one of the general conferences. Our people need to know it."
Church Leaders
John A. Widtsoe
General Authorities
"John A. Widtsoe" Facebook page, from the research of Ardis E. Parshall.
"This country was beautiful when the Pioneers first came. It was virgin territory. The hills, the streams, the forests and the plains were lovely, just as nature always is until marred by the hand of man."
Church Leaders
Stephen L. Richards
General Authorities
April 1940 General Conference
"We hear much about cleaning up the physical environment—air, water, and other essentials that are being polluted in a way that is poisoning the physical environment for all of us. We may choose to join in such efforts. But we who are responsible to push back against the world should be at least equally concerned about forces that are poisoning the moral environment. I refer to such moral pollutions as pornography. I also refer to language that pollutes public communications with profanity, vulgarity, and morally degrading coarseness. Push back against these kinds of pollutions also. "In all of these efforts, we can trust in the great promises of the Lord. He has taught us, 'If ye are prepared ye shall not fear' (D&C 38:30). He has also taught us that He does not ask anything of us except He prepares the way for us to accomplish it (see 1 Nephi 3:7). He has shown us that while He may not immediately answer our prayers for relief, He will strengthen us to bear the burdens placed upon us (see Mosiah 24:14–15)."
Church Leaders
Dallin H. Oaks
General Authorities
"Push Back Against the World," BYU-Hawaii commencement, Feb 25, 2017.
"Many of you have seen the spiritual and temporal pollutions, scars, and damage wrought by man upon this earth and well may we all chime in with Enoch and ask ourselves: will we not have compassion upon the earth? Or are we too caught up in our personal pursuits and desires?"
Church Leaders
Marcus B. Nash
General Authorities
"Righteous Dominion and Compassion for the Earth." Speech at 18th Annual Stegner Center Symposium on 12 April, 2013.
"In the Book of Mormon, it is prophesied that in the latter-days there would be 'fires, tempests, and vapors of smoke . . . and . . . great pollutions upon the face of the earth,' and that such conditions would be coupled with 'murders, and robbing, and lying, and deceiving, and whoredoms, and all manner of abominations; when there shall be many who will say, Do this, or do that, and it mattereth not.' [Mormon 8:29-31] According to LDS scripture, there is a corollary between the selfish, materialistic man out to hoard money, material possessions, and/or the man with irreverence for life—and pollutions (spiritual or temporal) upon the face of the earth."
Church Leaders
Marcus B. Nash
General Authorities
"Righteous Dominion and Compassion for the Earth." Speech at 18th Annual Stegner Center Symposium on 12 April, 2013.
"As the human soul is thus changed, the environment is better cared for. The doctrine and commandments of God lead us beyond the suffocating, self-limiting weight of selfishness, the blinding press of self-gratification or aggrandizement. The gospel of Jesus Christ helps us think beyond ourselves, to think of the earth and all life given by God and to think of others now and in future generations, rather than pursue the immediate vindication of our personal desires or avowed rights. If I pursue a selfish, irreverent course, I pursue a course that gives license to despoil the earth, for pollution, damage, and waste are almost always the product of selfishness or irreverence. To the degree that religion teaches reverence for God, for His creations, for life, and for our fellowman, it will teach us to care for the environment. In short, the state of the human soul and the environment are interconnected, each affects and influences the other."
Church Leaders
Marcus B. Nash
General Authorities
"Righteous Dominion and Compassion for the Earth." Speech at 18th Annual Stegner Center Symposium on 12 April, 2013.
"According to LDS scripture, there is a corollary between the selfish, materialistic man out to hoard money, material possessions, and/or the man with irreverence for life—and pollutions (spiritual or temporal) upon the face of the earth."
Church Leaders
Marcus B. Nash
General Authorities
"Righteous Dominion and Compassion for the Earth." Speech at 18th Annual Stegner Center Symposium on 12 April, 2013.
"When He [Christ] interviews us, I feel certain that one of His questions will, in essence, be the following: 'What have you done with the earth which my Father and I gave you as a home? Have you cherished and protected it? Have you dressed it and kept it, as your father Adam was commanded to do? Or have you laid waste to it, defiled its waters, destroyed its fertile lands, befouled its life-giving air?' To those questions, I fear there are many, even among those who aspire to become a Zion people, who will hang their heads in shame. The earth groans under the insults inflicted upon it."
Church Leaders
Alexander B. Morrison
General Authorities
Visions of Zion, p. 77
“Those who live upon this land, or any other that God gives to His people, have peculiar promises made to them. Then do not pollute this land, nor pollute yourselves or your fellow creatures, but let us keep ourselves pure and clean.”
Church Leaders
Heber C. Kimball
General Authorities
Journal of Discourses, 3:262, June 10, 1855.
Enoch looked upon the earth; and he heard a voice from the bowels thereof, saying: Wo, wo is me, the mother of men; I am pained, I am weary, because of the wickedness of my children. When shall I rest, and be cleansed from the filthiness which is gone forth out of me?
Pearl of Great Price
48 7
Moses
Moses 7:48
"A far better gift than cash handouts to our nature-loving Boy Scouts, and school children, and to the freedom-loving citizens attending the festival in July, would be 'the clear blue sky [arching] over the values of the free,' the clearer the freer, including freedom from respiratory complications in later life. But of course there is one serious drawback to that. The clear blue skies cost much more than the highly publicized handouts."
Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Stewardship of the Air," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; this talk was given 16 February 1989 in Provo, Utah, as part of a Clear Air Symposium at Brigham Young University.
"He contrasts the situation with that of the Latter-day Saints 'spreading themselves on the face of the earth, and carefully cultivating it,' invigorated by 'the pure, bracing air, [and with it] health.'”
Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Stewardship of the Air," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; this talk was given 16 February 1989 in Provo, Utah, as part of a Clear Air Symposium at Brigham Young University.
"All nature smiles, and teems with health and brightness and fragrance, where you are, but over the valley before you rests an awful, impenetrable, dark, black cloud, . . . approximating to a realization of your ideal of the 'dark valley of the shadow of death.' . . . You walk down the hillside, and, as you enter the thick, dark cloud, . . . you feel no more the invigorating influences [of the sun], . . . a sense of oppressiveness falls upon you, and you realize, to your unmistakable discomfort, that the darkness around [you] can not only be seen, but felt and tasted. Suddenly, to your great astonishment, you discover that this dreary spot is inhabited by human beings!"
Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Stewardship of the Air," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; this talk was given 16 February 1989 in Provo, Utah, as part of a Clear Air Symposium at Brigham Young University.
"The most famous passage relevant to our subject is from another medieval epic, the opening refrain from Macbeth: 'Fair is foul, and foul is fair: Hover through the fog and filthy air.' Shakespeare must have got the idea from the Bible, which calls Satan the Prince of the Air, but also the Prince of Darkness—that kind of air."
Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Stewardship of the Air," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; this talk was given 16 February 1989 in Provo, Utah, as part of a Clear Air Symposium at Brigham Young University.
"Long ago, Eusebius, called the father of church history, tells of an early Christian tradition that the evil spirits which constantly seek to defile and corrupt human society 'move about in thick polluted air,' as a most fitting environment for their work. In a passage from a famous Hermetic work, the Koreø Kosmu (excerpt 23), the Air complains to the Creator, 'O Master, I myself am made thick and polluted, and by the stench of dead things from the dump I reek to heaven, so that I breed sickness, and have ceased to be wholesome; and when I look down from above I see things which are too awful to behold.'”
Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Stewardship of the Air," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; this talk was given 16 February 1989 in Provo, Utah, as part of a Clear Air Symposium at Brigham Young University.
"Without being able to tell exactly why, we take immediate offense at such statements, made by men in high positions, as 'I do not believe in conservation for conservation’s sake,' or 'I do not believe in clean water for the sake of clean water.' But we soon learn that our shocked first reaction is a healthy one; when the forest is reduced to the now proverbial one redwood, it is too late. What prevents such a catastrophe is not the logic of survival but the feelings of wrongness."
Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Brigham Young on the Environment," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; printed in Truman Madsen and Charles D. Tate, eds., To the Glory of God: Mormon Essays on Great Issues—Environment, Commitment, Love, Peace, Youth, Man (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1972), 3—29.
"Why should the enemy seek to pollute? There was an early Christian teaching, reported by Eusebius, that the evil spirits, being forever deprived of physical bodies, constantly go about in the world jealously seeking to defile and corrupt such bodies, glorying in foulness and putrefaction as they 'move about in thick, polluted air,' and make charnel houses and garbage dumps their favorite haunts"
Other Sources
Hugh Nibley
Other Writings of Mormons
"Brigham Young on the Environment," from Hugh Nibley's Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints; printed in Truman Madsen and Charles D. Tate, eds., To the Glory of God: Mormon Essays on Great Issues—Environment, Commitment, Love, Peace, Youth, Man (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1972), 3—29.
"I have often thought that in our day and age—and I believe that there is some precedence in the scriptures for this, such as references to pollution in the last days and so on—one of the areas at which we could look seriously and about which we could feel good is this area of cleaning up our environment. I have a feeling that pollution is going to get worse and that there are going to be a lot of jobs in this area. I am convinced that the Lord is against pollution. He is against perversion. He is against prostitution—and prostitution has a much broader meaning than just its limited sexual sense; it really means perverting something from its correct use to an incorrect use. I would think that prostitution and pollution and perversion are all about the same, and God is against such things. How we treat him is reflected in how we treat others who are his children, and how we treat the elements and other forms of life on this earth, which are his. He created them. If there were one safe area in which to look for a livelihood, I think it would be in this area. I do not know whether this would be your avocation or not, but you might think about it. I am convinced in my own mind that we have not really fulfilled our mission in life as individuals or as a Church until we have demonstrated and shown as much advancement in other areas as we have in theology. We know how government ought to be, we know how society ought to be, we know what cleanliness ought to be, we know what the environment really should be; we should lead out in these areas. For instance, we recognize that we have environmental problems. I am not sure what the answer is, but I do not think the answer is what some “environmentalists” think it is—that is, to stop whatever we are doing—because we as a race must produce. I am not sure how to do it, but I am sure that there is a right way; we just need to discover it. I do not believe that the Lord is pleased with the constant corruption and pollution we so willingly endure—not just spiritually, but physically—to achieve some of our goals. I personally cannot help but believe that there is a better way. I cannot help but feel that God knows how to transform all of these base materials into useful tools without all the choking clouds of dust and the stench of pollution in our rivers and streams. He put our resources here, he put us here, and he knows what we need. He knows what is here and how to get things done. I do not think that he is against energy. I think that he is for all of these things, and wants us to use them in the proper way to get around, do his work, and build up his kingdom. But my faith is that there is a better way than we now know. He wants us to use the elements—to mold them for our use—but in a different way. Now should that not be something that you students here at BYU could figure out—with the Lord’s help? (And who should be closer to him than you?) We have talked about missions for individuals, and we are all aware of the Church mission. In my mind, BYU, as part of the Church, should become the pollution control center of the world—not only spiritually, but physically. I feel that this is important. We take the gospel to all the world in a spiritual way; we ought to do it in other ways, also . . . I guess we could say that, as far as our life’s mission is concerned, both spiritually and physically, we could feel good about doing away with pollution and putting purity in its place. That is a real challenge and is something that we should do. You at this University should be the leaders in doing it."
Other Sources
John H. Groberg
Other Writings of Mormons
"What is Your Mission?" Brigham Young University 1979 Speech
"As such, from both a scientific and spiritual perspective, environmental science and LDS theology both teach that if we live and consume with no respect for earth's delicate balance, we endanger the earth and ourselves."
Other Sources
Craig Galli
Other Writings of Mormons
"Enoch’s Vision and Gaia: An LDS Perspective on Environmental Stewardship" in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, 44, no.2 (Summer 2011)
"Environmentalism fits within a social justice movement as it focuses on the distribution of benefits and burdens of modern economic and industrial life. Burdens such as pollution and toxic wastes are not distributed randomly or equally but disproportionately affect low income communities."
Other Sources
Gary C. Bryner
Other Writings of Mormons
"Theology and Ecology: Religious Belief and Environmental Stewardship," in BYU Studies 49, no. 3 (2010)
"The livestock industry is 'by far the single largest anthropogenic user of land,' a leading contributor to deforestation and land degradation, and a major factor in the reduction of biodiversity. And livestock produce 130 times more waste in the US than humans do, leading to widespread pollution of land and water."
Other Sources
Jane Birch
Other Writings of Mormons
Discovering the Word of Wisdom, pg 85
"With the population explosion, the carcinoma of planless urbanism, the new geological deposits of sewage and garbage, surely no creature other than man has ever managed to foul its nest in such short order."
Other Sources
Lynn White
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
"The Historical Roots of Our Ecological Crisis" in The Ecocriticism Reader: Landmarks in Literary Ecology. Ed. C. Glotfelty and H. Fromm. Athens, Georgia: U of Georgia Press, 1996.
"Our common home is like a sister with whom we share our life and a beautiful mother who opens her arms to embrace us . . . This sister now cries out to us because of the harm we have inflicted on her by our irresponsible use and abuse of the goods with which God has endowed her. We have come to see ourselves as her lords and masters, entitled to plunder her at will. The violence present in our hearts, wounded by sin, is also reflected in the symptoms of sickness evident in the soil, in the water, in the air and in all forms of life. This is why the earth herself, burdened and laid waste, is among the most abandoned and maltreated of our poor . . . "
Other Sources
Pope Francis
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Encyclical Letter Laudato Si': On Care for Our Common Home (24 May 2015)
“Good farmers, who take seriously their duties as stewards of Creation and of their land's inheritors, contribute to the welfare of society in more ways than society usually acknowledges, or even knows. These farmers produce valuable goods, of course; but they also conserve soil, they conserve water, they conserve wildlife, they conserve open space, they conserve scenery.”
Other Sources
Wendell Berry
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
Bringing it to the Table: On Farming and Food
"I believe that pollution and environmental deterioration are primarily moral and spiritual problems, rather than problems of technology. Technology is mindless—a double-edged sword that will either produce or reduce pollution as man wills it. The prevalence of pollution stems from a lack of proper knowledge and understanding of the real purpose of life and of man’s place in the eternal plan provided by a loving Father in heaven."
Other Sources
A.B. Morrison
Church Magazines
"Our Deteriorating Environment" in Aug 1971 Ensign.
"Our environment has been tragically exploited and abused. Although not yet irretrievably befouled, it has deteriorated in too many ways, and a great deal of hard work and effort is required to protect it and repair the damage done by neglect, indifference, and misplaced priorities. However, I am optimistic that man will in fact draw back from the edge of the pit, that he will recognize his vulnerability, and that he will work to reorganize his priorities and motivations."
Other Sources
A.B. Morrison
Church Magazines
"Our Deteriorating Environment" in Aug 1971 Ensign.
"And there are valuable lessons to be learned from the discovery and control of this potential health hazard. First, pollution may affect biological systems hundreds of miles from the source of the pollution itself. High mercury levels in fish in Lake Winnipeg may have resulted from practices followed by a single industrial plant in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, hundreds of miles up the Saskatchewan River."
Other Sources
A.B. Morrison
Church Magazines
"Our Deteriorating Environment" in Aug 1971 Ensign.
"[T]he ocean is not an inexhaustible reservoir that can be polluted forever without deleterious effects on biological systems."
Other Sources
A.B. Morrison
Church Magazines
"Our Deteriorating Environment" in Aug 1971 Ensign.
Defile not therefore the land which ye shall inhabit, wherein I dwell: for I the Lord dwell among the children of Israel.
Old Testament
34 35
Numbers
Numbers 35:34
So ye shall not pollute the land wherein ye are: for blood it defileth the land: and the land cannot be cleansed of the blood that is shed therein, but by the blood of him that shed it.
Old Testament
33 35
Numbers
Numbers 35:33
Lift up thine eyes unto the high places, and see where thou hast not been lien with. In the ways hast thou sat for them, as the Arabian in the wilderness; and thou hast polluted the land with thy whoredoms and with thy wickedness.
Old Testament
2 3
Jeremiah
Jeremiah 3:2
For the Lord thy God bringeth thee into a good land, a land of brooks of water, of fountains and depths that spring out of valleys and hills;
Old Testament
7 8
Deuteronomy
Deuteronomy 8:7
Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.
New Testament
8 4
Philippians
Philippians 4:8
But fornication, and all uncleanness, or covetousness, let it not be once named among you, as it becometh saints;
New Testament
3 5
Ephesians
Ephesians 5:3
Mortify therefore your members which are upon the earth; fornication, uncleanness, inordinate affection, evil concupiscence, and covetousness, which is idolatry: For which things' sake the wrath of God cometh on the children of disobedience.
New Testament
5-6 3
Colossians
Colossians 3:5-6
Having therefore these promises, dearly beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit, perfecting holiness in the fear of God.
New Testament
1 7
2 Corinthians
2 Corinthians 7:1
For God hath not called us unto uncleanness, but unto holiness.
New Testament
7 4
1 Thessalonians
1 Thessalonians 4:7
Nevertheless, if they pollute their inheritances they shall be thrown down; for I will not spare them if they pollute their inheritances.
Doctrine and Covenants
14 103
D&C
D&C 103:14
But verily I say unto you, I have decreed that your brethren which have been scattered shall return to the lands of their inheritances, and shall build up the waste places of Zion.
Doctrine and Covenants
11 103
D&C
D&C 103:11
And they came to a land, yea, even a very beautiful and pleasant land, a land of pure water.
Book of Mormon
4 23
Mosiah
Mosiah 23:4
And again, he saith: If my people shall sow filthiness they shall reap the chaff thereof in the whirlwind; and the effect thereof is poison.
Book of Mormon
30 6
Mosiah
Mosiah 6:30
I say unto you, that the man that doeth this, the same cometh out in open rebellion against God; therefore he listeth to obey the evil spirit, and becometh an enemy to all righteousness; therefore, the Lord has no place in him, for he dwelleth not in unholy temples.
Book of Mormon
37 2
Mosiah
Mosiah 2:37
And again I would exhort you that ye would come unto Christ, and lay hold upon every good gift, and touch not the evil gift, nor the unclean thing.
Book of Mormon
30 10
Moroni
Moroni 10:30
And I say unto you again that he cannot save them in their sins; for I cannot deny his word, and he hath said that no unclean thing can inherit the kingdom of heaven; therefore, how can ye be saved, except ye inherit the kingdom of heaven? Therefore, ye cannot be saved in your sins.
Book of Mormon
37 10
Alma
Alma 10:37
Wherefore, if ye have sought to do wickedly in the days of your probation, then ye are found unclean before the judgment-seat of God; and no unclean thing can dwell with God; wherefore, ye must be cast off forever.
Book of Mormon
21 10
1 Nephi
1 Nephi 10:21