Specific Steps toward Stewardship

"According to a careful study done at the University of Chicago, people who consume animal foods are responsible for an extra ton and a half of CO2 equivalent per person per year, as compared to people who consume no animal foods. As a consequence, a person who changes from an animal-based diet to a plant-based diet would save more greenhouse emissions per year than switching from a Toyota Camry to a hybrid Toyota Prius (at much less cost!). If everyone on the planet switched to a low-meat diet, such a transition would dramatically impact our ability to resolve environmental issues that now appear intractable. One estimate suggests such a global change 'would reduce the mitigation costs to achieve a 450 ppm CO2 -eq. stabilization target by about 50 percent in 2050.'"
Other Sources
Jane Birch
Other Writings of Mormons
Discovering the Word of Wisdom, pg 85
"I garden, compost, recycle, reuse, buy less, avoid buying disposable items (I hate buying things for the express purpose of throwing them away), use canvas shopping bags, walk instead of drive, ride my bike with a trailer if I need to haul a kid or groceries, grow herbs, bake bread and granola, cook food from scratch, can fruit and preserves, hang clothes to air dry, mend damaged clothing, shop at thrift stores for everything from clothes and household goods to small appliances and furniture, buy locally produced goods from farmer’s markets and CSA programs, and donate serviceable items I no longer use to local thrift stores and charities. I can't image that these practices are out of the ordinary. Doubtless many who read this article do at least some of these things as well."
Other Sources
Rachel Mabey Whipple
Other Writings of Mormons
"Practicing Stewardship in a Consumer Culture," Sunstone 167, 25 June 2012.
"I try to practice these principles of stewardship in my own home. Some of what I do takes more work and time than most Americans are used to spending on household chores, but I find that my efforts increase my sense of worth as a stay-at-home mom and improves my family’s quality of life. I am reclaiming the virtue of my domestic work from the disposable convenience products corporations want to sell me."
Other Sources
Rachel Mabey Whipple
Other Writings of Mormons
"Practicing Stewardship in a Consumer Culture," Sunstone 167, 25 June 2012.
Church spokesman Scott Trotter explained the symbolism behind turning off the exterior lights on the Salt Lake Temple at the designated hour: “Prudent stewardship and wise use of resources are principles that church leaders principals have emphasized throughout the history of the church. The church encourages its members to join with their fellow citizens in supporting fellow worthy programs that will make their communities better places to live and raise their better make their communities better places to live and raise their families.”
Other Sources
Scott Trotter
Other Writings of Mormons
"Some buildings in S.L. to dim for Earth Hour" by Scott Taylor, Deseret News (Mar. 29, 2009)
"C. Arden Pope III is a professor of economics at BYU who has been widely recognized for his cross-disciplinary work in environmental epidemiology and public health, especially for his seminal studies of the effects of particulate air pollution on mortality and health. His articles have helped establish the connection between air pollution and health problems, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. These research findings have influenced environmental policy in the United States and Europe, contributing to the establishment of emission standards for particulates. His work was cited by the U.S. Supreme Court in Whitman v. American Trucking Associations Inc., 531 US 457 (2001)."
Other Sources
Michael D. Smart
Other Writings of Mormons
“Clearing the Air,” BYU Magazine (Spring 2007).
"The question must be asked of the faithful Latter-day Saint, 'How can families be self-sufficient when acts of environmental degradation by others are robbing them of the primary resource on which they depend for sustenance?' For example, when a Church member in the midwestern United States pours chemical cleaning agents into the toilet bowl, does that person pause to think that nearby rivers will carry the chemicals into an overpolluted dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico where a Mexican member is trying to realize an income as a prawn fisherman? Or when a Church member has a choice of purchasing a small, fuel-efficient vehicle or a large, fuel-guzzling SUV, does that person think of the effect that purchase may have on the atmosphere and an African member's ability to grow maize and feed a growing family?"
Other Sources
David Osborn
Other Writings of Mormons
“Rattlesnakes and Beehives: Why Latter-day Saints Should Support Ecologically Sustainable Development,” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 155–64.
"Disciples of Christ cannot choose the do-nothing option simply because there are competing and politically sensitive arguments. The duty to obey supersedes the detail."
Other Sources
David Osborn
Other Writings of Mormons
“Rattlesnakes and Beehives: Why Latter-day Saints Should Support Ecologically Sustainable Development,” in Stewardship and the Creation: LDS Perspectives on the Environment, eds. George B. Handley, Terry B. Ball, and Steven L. Peck (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center), 155–64.
“This is a member-driven initiative,” said Davies, “it's representative of how our members feel about the communities in which they live.”
Other Sources
Dean Davies
Other Writings of Mormons
"Solar-Powered Construction Design Gets 'Green' Light from Church Leaders," Mormon Newsroom, 27 April 2010.
“These buildings are designed to last many, many years,” said Dean Davies, managing director of the Physical Facilities department of the Church, “It may actually cost more up front to put certain systems in but because they have lower operating costs and longer life cycles in the long run they are better for us and better for the environment.”
Other Sources
Dean Davies
Other Writings of Mormons
"Solar-Powered Construction Design Gets 'Green' Light from Church Leaders," Mormon Newsroom, 27 April 2010.
"A personal ethic of conservation, uncomplicated by the messiness of politics and collective action, seems attractive. Working out the details of political action requires compromise, patience, and time; environmental policies also tend to conflict with other pressing priorities. But our obligations to each other and to those who come after us cannot be discharged by our mere acceptance of worthy goals and true principles. Those obligations require that we plunge into the world of politics and work with others who may disagree with us on many issues in order to find common ground and workable solutions to the problems we face together."
Other Sources
Gary C. Bryner
Other Writings of Mormons
"Theology and Ecology: Religious Belief and Environmental Stewardship," in BYU Studies 49, no. 3 (2010)
"Many conservatives balk at expanding the regulatory reach of government into their economic lives, preferring to be left alone to work out their own ideas of what constitutes environmental stewardship. But conservatives accept and even welcome governmental involvement in many aspects of their personal lives—for instance, in curtailing pornography, regulating reproductive decisions, and promoting national security. Because protecting the environment for the benefit of future generations is also a compelling moral imperative, government regulation can be similarly justified if it can create the kind of moral environment conservatives seek. "
Other Sources
Gary C. Bryner
Other Writings of Mormons
"Theology and Ecology: Religious Belief and Environmental Stewardship," in BYU Studies 49, no. 3 (2010)
"Those with a commitment to stewardship will have to wade into the political thicket and work with others—both those who share a similar vision and those who see environmental problems in a different light—to construct workable policies."
Other Sources
Gary C. Bryner
Other Writings of Mormons
"Theology and Ecology: Religious Belief and Environmental Stewardship," in BYU Studies 49, no. 3 (2010)
“Hopefully, with this added knowledge and awareness that we've shared with people, they'll be able to make a few small changes that will help improve the condition of our planet.”
Other Sources
Lisa Rampton
Church Magazines
"What It Means to Be Green" in July 1992 New Era.
“We used to put two big garbage cans out for the trash man each time he came,” says Jenni. “Now we only use one a week. It feels good to know we're not putting such a strain on the landfills.”
Other Sources
Spencer Garvey
Church Magazines
"What It Means to Be Green" in July 1992 New Era.
“If we are respectful of the planet, the creation, if we have a humble and a meek attitude toward the creations of our Heavenly Father, each of us in some way can indeed make a difference. That may mean doing something as simple as turning off a water tap that’s running, or cleaning our home and property so it’s pleasant and beautiful, or being careful in how we use energy so we Don't waste resources. It may mean treating domestic animals with kindness and compassion, or doing what we can to pick up litter and clean up local areas. I think the issue is not what we do; it’s that we do something, and that we do it with an attitude of praise."
Other Sources
Paul Cox
Church Magazines
"Paul Cox—Preserving God’s Creations" in Nov 1998 Liahona.
"My two favourite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: riding a bike to the library.”
Other Sources
Peter Golkin
Inspired Writings of Non-Mormons
"Arlington Public Library Partner Spotlight: Peter Golkin, Public Information Officer," Arlington's Car Free Diet website.
"These 10 steps can help you save money on utility bills and conserve energy."
Other Sources
Jerry Mason
Church Magazines
"Tips for Energy Conservation," Sep 1998 Ensign.
"Voicing the oft-repeated concept of teaching people correct principles and permitting them to govern themselves, President Oaks said, 'We have avoided setting out specific courses of action in the [conservation] policy because we wanted to set basic principles that would guide us in multiple situations over a considerable period of time.'"
Other Sources
First Presidency First Presidency
Church Magazines
"Energy Crisis: First Presidency Encourages Conservation of Fuel; Reports From the Saints Around the World," Feb 1974 Ensign.
"Students returning home for the Christmas vacation were requested by President Dallin H. Oaks to leave their cars behind when they returned. Like Church employees in Salt Lake City, BYU staff, faculty, and students were urged to use car pools if they had long distances to travel to campus each day, or to walk or use bicycles."
Other Sources
First Presidency First Presidency
Church Magazines
"Energy Crisis: First Presidency Encourages Conservation of Fuel; Reports From the Saints Around the World," Feb 1974 Ensign.
"Looking ahead, the task force recommended that new buildings under construction, or under consideration, should be designed for conservation of energy."
Other Sources
First Presidency First Presidency
Church Magazines
"Energy Crisis: First Presidency Encourages Conservation of Fuel; Reports From the Saints Around the World," Feb 1974 Ensign.
"At Brigham Young University, a special task force is seeking to eliminate any waste of energy and to propose conservation methods on campus. However BYU has been practicing energy conservation for many years and surveys indicate that it may be the most efficiently-used campus in the world. The campus is also used year-round, a request made of other American universities by President Richard M. Nixon."
Other Sources
First Presidency First Presidency
Church Magazines
"Energy Crisis: First Presidency Encourages Conservation of Fuel; Reports From the Saints Around the World," Feb 1974 Ensign.
"With all the problems arising from a shortage of gasoline, President Max L. Pinegar, president of the Netherlands Mission, reports that, during the past several weeks, 'we have had a number of branches reporting an increase in attendance both at Sunday School and sacrament meeting. President Cornelis de Bruijn of the Holland Stake tells me that sacrament meeting attendance has not dropped even though the members are not permitted to drive on Sunday.'"
Other Sources
First Presidency First Presidency
Church Magazines
"Energy Crisis: First Presidency Encourages Conservation of Fuel; Reports From the Saints Around the World," Feb 1974 Ensign.
"For many of the Saints, a shortage of gasoline for personal cars is not a problem as they usually travel by public transportation, by bicycle, or on foot. In the Netherlands, for instance, personal driving on Sunday has been banned. Elder Jacob de Jager, regional representative of the Council of the Twelve for the Holland Region, told the Ensign that he has to obtain a special permit to use his car on Sundays for Church work."
Other Sources
First Presidency First Presidency
Church Magazines
"Energy Crisis: First Presidency Encourages Conservation of Fuel; Reports From the Saints Around the World," Feb 1974 Ensign.
"The letter also suggested that 'the topic of fuel conservation be seriously discussed by all members of the family in a family home evening.'"
Other Sources
First Presidency First Presidency
Church Magazines
"Energy Crisis: First Presidency Encourages Conservation of Fuel; Reports From the Saints Around the World," Feb 1974 Ensign.
"The First Presidency also authorized other measures to cope with the energy crisis, including: —Eliminating all outside lighting at Church buildings, except that necessary to provide adequate security or prevent injury. —Encouraging Church members to join car pools and urging them to observe prescribed speed limits. —Lowering thermostats in homes where feasible and eliminating unnecessary consumption of electricity or fuel. "
Other Sources
First Presidency First Presidency
Church Magazines
"Energy Crisis: First Presidency Encourages Conservation of Fuel; Reports From the Saints Around the World," Feb 1974 Ensign.
"In a letter to all stakes, wards, branches, and missions, the First Presidency encouraged members, among other measures, to walk to church meetings where feasible, hold back-to-back meetings, and hold all auxiliary activities on one day of the week."
Other Sources
First Presidency First Presidency
Church Magazines
"Energy Crisis: First Presidency Encourages Conservation of Fuel; Reports From the Saints Around the World," Feb 1974 Ensign.